Quin, John Isaac (15/2/1900 - 19/3/1950)

Born at Klerksdorp on 15 February 1900, he graduated BVSc with the first group of 7 students to qualify at the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort in 1924. He immediately joined the Government Service and was appointed Research Officer in Bacteriology at Onderstepoort, but later became a lecturer in Physiology at the Veterinary Faculty. Thereafter he was appointed Professor of Physiology in 1934 and served in this capacity until his promotion to Director of Veterinary Services on 1/12/1949. He died on the train returning to Pretoria from Nelspruit on 19/3/1950 while travelling with Norris Dodd the Director General of F.A.O.

He was an expert on Rumenal and sex hormone physiology In 1928 he was awarded the DVSc degree by the University of South Africa.

 

Quinlan, D.J. ( - 23/6/1909)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in July 1899 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 12/11/1899 to 16/10/1902. From 1900 he served at the Mooi River Remount Depot with F.J. Carless, G.M. Williams and H.M. Durant. After service he returned to England.

 

Quinlan, John Bagot (12/7/1887 - 12/8/1970)

Born on 12/7/1887 at Fethard, County Tipperary, Eire, "JB" qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 22/7/1912 and the same year was awarded the Fitzwygram 1st Prize as the top veterinary student in the British Isles. After qualifying he came to South Africa as lecturer in Veterinary Science at the Potchefstroom College of Agriculture. During World War I he served as a Captain in the SAVC. In 1920 he was stationed at Allerton laboratory.

On the establishment of the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort he was appointed the first professor of surgery, gynaecology and obstetrics in 1922. In this post he served until retirement in July 1947. Thereafter he practiced first in Cape Town and then in Mooi River and finally in Durban where he died on 12/8/1970 while dosing a horse.

He was probably the greatest equine veterinary surgeon of his time. In 1922 he was awarded the Dr Med Vet (Hanover) degree followed by the FRCVS in 1928 and DVSc (SA) in 1929.

 

Robyn, Frederick Stewart ( - 13/7/1956)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14/12/1899 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 15/4/1902 to 29/12/1907. After service he returned to England. He died at Sidmouth, Devon on 13/7/1956.

 

Rainey, J. Wakefield C.B.E. ( -1967)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 20/12/1904 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 14/12/1910 to 5/8/1913. He subsequently returned to South Africa in 1938 and served as Secretary, Handicapper and Measurer to the Bloemfontein Turf Club. He is recorded as the first veterinarian to have served in this capacity in South Africa. During his absence from South Africa he served as Assistant Director General of the Army Veterinary Services 1915 - 1919; Chief Veterinary Officer of the Fiji Islands (1919 - 1921) and editor of the official History of the Great War (Veterinary Services). On 5/9/1967 the RCVS was informed that he had died some time previously.

 

Rangeley, Herbert ( - 1889)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in December 1870 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Natal) in 1884 as a trooper and accompanied the Warren expedition together with Duck, Brown, Gentle, Cox and Rutherford. The reason for him being a Trooper being that he retired from the Army Veterinary Department on 22/1/1878. After service he returned to England and died in 1889.

 

Rayment, George Joseph Robert (2/5/1851 - 7/7/1903)

Born on 2/5/1851 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 17/4/1871 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service in South Africa with the Army Veterinary Department on two occasions viz. in 1879 and from 1899 to 1902. He took part in the Egyptian Campaign of 1882 and Waziristan Campaign of 1895. Due to I. Matthews, the Principal Veterinary Officer of the A.V.D., being besieged at Ladysmith, the A.V.D. in South Africa was without a Commander until he arrived with the rank of Lieut Colonel in Cape Town on 19/11/1899. After a delay he was appointed acting P.V.O. At the end of his services he returned to England. He died in Nigeria on 7/7/1903 at the aged of 52 years.

 

Raymond, Francis C.I.E. ( - 17/5/1945)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 5/1/1877 and with his regiment saw service in Natal in 1879 in the Zulu War of that year.

 

Raymond, Richard Wellington (20/9/1859 - 1946)

Born on 20/9/1859 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 13/1/1883 and saw service in South Africa as a regular A.V.D. officer on two occasions viz. from 1/12/1887 to 16/8/1893 and again from 10/6/1898 to 10/11/1904. From 1888 to 1893 he was stationed at Eshowe whereas during his second tour of duty he as stationed at Pietermaritzburg and was besieged at Ladysmith. He returned to England on 10/11/1904. n May 1946 the RCVS Registry was informed that he was "deceased".

 

Reece, R.S.

During the Boer War he saw active service in South Africa for a unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Rees, William David (1877 - 23/2/1952

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 29/3/1897 and saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time during the Boer War. After the war he returned to England. He died at Craigside, Penygraig, Glamorgan on 23/2/1952 aged 75 years.

 

Reid, James ( - 1951)

He graduated BSc (Agric) in 1922 and BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort in 1926. On 2/4/1927 he joined the Division of Veterinary Services and saw service as a State Veterinarian at Louis Trichardt (30/3/1927 to 2/7/1927), Nylstroom, Pietersburg (November 1927), Cape Town, Estcourt and Allerton Laboratory. In 1930 he left the service and purchased C.H. Wadlow's practice in Port Elizabeth when the latter moved to Cape Town.

In 1933 he is reported to have farmed and practiced in the Standerton district. His death took place in 1951 on his father's farm Elmtree, in the Standerton district from an overdose of Nembutal injection.

 

Reichert, Mieczyslaw Stanislaw (21/7/1904 - 7/5/1985)

Born in Bobrka, Poland on 21/7/1904 he qualified as a veterinarian at the University of Lwow in 1931. In 1938 he obtained the Dr Med Vet degree from that University. After qualifying he served in the Polish Army at Tranopol in eastern Poland. When his country was invaded by the German army in 1939, his regiment crossed into Yugoslavia and from there via Italy to France. With the collapse of France in 1940 his unit was evacuated to Scotland. He spent the remainder of World War II servng I the Free Polish army in Scotland. On 11/7/1946 he obtained his MRCVS (Edinburgh) and in March 1947 took up an appointment as Veterinary Officer (Francistown) with the Bechuanaland Protectorate Government. In September 1957 he was promoted to the post of Deputy Director in that service and was stationed at Mafeking. He was awarded the M.B.E. in the 1959 New Year Honours List. He retired from the Bechuanaland service in December 1960 and practiced in Bulawayo until January 1974 when he contracted to serve the S.P.C.A. Cape Town for a period of three years. He finally retired in 1977 and settled permanently in Cape Town. He died there suddenly of a burst Aorta on 7/5/1985.

 

Reilly, James (1/6/1847 - 3/3/1922)

Born on 1/6/1847 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 17/4/1867 and wit his regiment saw service in South Africa from 1881 to 1882. He died on 3/3/1922. On 17/5/1897 he was presented by HRH the Prince of Wales at a Levee on the occasion of his promotion to Lieut. Colonel. (See Harris page 79).

 

Rennie, Thomas

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 18/12/1897 and during the Boer War saw service in south Africa for the duration of the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he joined the Veterinary Department of Burma where he served for 25 years. During World War I he commanded a fort defending the Rangoon river while the "Emden" was raiding in the gulf of Martaban. At the conclusions of World War I he returned to England where he died at Haywards Heath Hospital at the age of 55 on 16/6/1932.

 

Revill, William C.B. ( - 2/3/1926)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 26/3/1886 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon I the A.V.D. He died on 2/3/1926.

 

Revington, Thomas le Blanc (13/6/1887 - 1927)

Born on 13/6/1887 he qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 24/7/1911. He is reported to have served in World War I in the South African Mounted Rifles as a Rifleman (No. 2348) in the South West Africa Campaign, but in December 1915 was commissioned in the SAVC and took part in the East Africa Campaign. On 1/4/1920 he was appointed as Government Veterinary Officer in South West Africa (Otjivarongo). On 29/12/1924 he was posted back to South Africa and was succeeded by J. Bone. On 1/2/1926 he resigned from the service and went to live in Australia. He died there in 1928 in Perth. Professor P.J.J. Fourie informed the author that he was a brilliant Biochemist and was responsible for the identification of the Porphyrins as the cause of discolouration in Pink Tooth in cattle.

 

Richardson, Alexander E. ( - 25/1/1905)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in March 1885 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 3/11/1899 to 24/1/1905 with the 6th Dragoon Guards at Rensburg and "R" Battery of the R.H.A. etc.. He died at Bloemfontein on 25/1/1905.

 

Richardson, James

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 18/7/1886 and it is not known when he came to South Africa. In January 1893 he commenced practice from the Masonic Hotel in Johannesburg. It is also recorded that in July of that year he was fined for smashing the stalls of the Standard Theatre while intoxicated. However, it is recorded that he, together with Arnold Theiler, E.a. Hollingham and F.A. Britten were appointed Honorary Veterinary Surgeons to the first Johannesburg Agricultural (Rand) show held in March 1895. He also sent his good wishes to the inaugural meeting of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical association held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16/2/1903.

 

Richardson, Ulick Forster (1887 - 31/3/1962)

He qualified BSc and MRCVS (London) on 22/12/1910 and in 1954 was living at 34 Howick road, Pietermaritzburg. He paid membership fees to the Natal Branch of the SAVA from 1950 to 1960. During his lifetime he had been V.O. and D.DVS in the Veternary Department of Uganda. He died on the island of Malta on 31/3/1962 aged "over 80". In actual fact he was 75 years old.

 

Richmond Frederick James ( - 21/10/1927)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 14/4/1880 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Oldham, Lancs on 21/10/1927.

 

Riddell, Robert (12/9.1859 - )

As a veterinary graduate of Ontario Veterinary College (1880) he served with the North West Mounted Police (North-West Rebellion Medal with clasp) until the end of 1899 when he came to South Africa with the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. He returned to Canada on 16/7/1902. In South Africa he took part in operations in the Cape Colony (actions at Colesburg and Kheis) Organge River Colony (Vet Rivier and Zandr Rivier) and Transvaal from may 1900 to May 1902

 

Robberts, Herbert Keeling ( - 15/12/1962)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 16/12/1903 and on 15/11/1907 was appointed Veterinary Bacteriologist to the Orange Free State Government. In 1910 he was still in the employ of that Government. He died on 15/12/1962.

 

Roberts, Norcott d'E ( - 1945)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 26/5/1900 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa during the Boer War. After the war he returned to England. He died in 1945.

 

Robertson, William (22/6/1872 - 22/2/1918)

Born in Scotland on 22/6/1872 he qualified MRCVS (London) in December 1893. after undergoing suitable training, including training at the Pasteur Institute, he was appointed on 23/5/1896 by the Cape of Good Hope Civil Veterinary Department as assistant to Dr Alexander Edington, Colonial Bacteriologist at Grahamstown. In October 1896 he and Edington proceeded to Taungs on Rinderpest Research. His stay at Grahamstown was however, intermittent, because in July 1897 he accompanied the Diamond Field Horse Regiment as their Veterinary Officer to Mashonaland in order to suppress the rebellion there. In 1899 he proceeded to England under Edington's instruction to deliver blood specimens of Horsesickness to McFadyean's laboratory. Following on Edngton's resignation on 30/6/1905 he took over control of the Grahamstown laboratory as Director of Research. On 39/9.1907 he visited Arnold Theiler's laboratory at Daspoort and at the same time attended the 3rd Annual Congress of the Inter-Colonial Agricultural Union held in Pretoria. On 12th January 1909 he once again visited Pretoria to attend the Pan African Veterinary Conference which was held in Pretoria to corresponds with te offcial opening of the new Onderstepoort laboratory.

After the establishment of Union in 1910 he was appointed as Assistant Director of Veterinary Research based in Grahamstown together with H. Watkins-Pitchford who was based in Pietermaritzburg. The same year he was transferred to Onderstepoort, but due to il health was allowed to return to Grahamstown in 1914. As Veterinary Research Officer he continued to serve in Grahamstown until his death there on 22/12/1918.

In 1938 a silver plaque presented to him by the farmers of Albany district in gratitude for services rendered to them, together with a signed photograph, was handed to the South African Veterinary Medical Association by his widow.

 

Robinson, Eric Maxwell (12/10/1891 - 28/6/1982)

Born on 12/10/1891 at Market Deeping, Lincoln, England, the son of John Andrew Robinson MRCVS (Edinburgh 1885) 4/3/1864 - 3/9.1915, he came to South Africa in 1901 to join his parents in Knysna. After passing his matric at Mossel Bay he proceeded to the Royal Veterinary College, London where he obtained his MRCVS in 1912. In so doing he became the first son of a veterinarian in South Africa to qualify as a veterinarian.

After qualifying as a veterinarian he practiced for a year in England and then returned to South Africa to work as an assistant to Sir Arnold Theiler at Onderstepoort . Form 1913 to 1919 he worked on Tuberculosis, Contagious Abortion and Botulism.

In 1920 he proceeded to the Veterinary High School, Berne where he obtained the degree of Dr Med Vet for his thesis "The carrier in bovine contagious abortion". On returning to South Africa he was placed in charge of the Allerton Veterinary Laboratory, Pietermaritzburg where he remained until 1922. While at Allerton he commenced his studies on the serology of trypanasomias which was later continued at Onderstepoort.

In 1922 he was appointed Lecturer in Bacteriology at the newly established Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort which position he held until 1928 when he was appointed professor of infectious diseases. This position he held until his retirement at the end of 1951. In addition to his academic duties he himself earned the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Science (DVSc) from the University of South Africa for his thesis "The Bacteria of the Clostridium Botulinum C and D types".

In 1929 he was also placed in charge of the Bacterial Vaccine Section at Onderstepoort and in 1931 was appointed as Sub-Director of Veterinary Services. In 1947 he rose to the rank of Assistant Director and in April 1951 to the rank of Deputy Director.

On 31/12/1956 he retired from his duties with the faculty, but served as a temporary State Veterinarian at Onderstepoort until 31/3/1958 when he finally retired and joined the South African Bureau of Standards as a temporary Assistant Technical Officer. In this position he remained until his final retirement in January 1960. Thereafter he settled at Knysna.

That same year he established the first private veterinary practice in Knysna and in 1977 when a younger colleague also established himself there, he was pleased to step down from active practice and to concentrate on animal welfare duties. He had served as an animal welfare inspector from 1970 to 1977. During his lifetime Professor E.M. Robinson held the following important public offices:

1931 - President of the South African Biological society

1932 - President of Section C of the South African Association for the advancement of Science

1935 - Member of the Council of the S.A.V.M.A.

1937 - Awarded the Senior Captain Scott Medal for Scientific Research by the South African Biological Society

1940 -1945 and 1951 - 1958 - Served as Editor of the SAVMA Journal

1945 - President of the Pretoria Rotary Club

1978 - Awarded the Gold Medal of the S.A.V.M.A.

1981 - Awarded the Paul Harris award for his services to Rotary

On 18/6/1924 he married Miss Bergit Osmundsen and of the two children born of this marriage (John Eric 18/4/1925 and Britha Nora 30/3/1928), John graudated as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in 1949 and Britha married D.C.L. Wacher also a graduate of Onderstepoort (BVSc 1951). Mrs Robinson died in July 1949. On 15/12/1951 he remarried to Miss Dorothy Amy Proctor.

E.M. Robinson died in Knysna on the 28th of June 1982 having completed writing up his life history for this manuscript three days before. These were probably the last words he wrote at the end of an active and illustrious career. His students of 30 years will always remember him as a quiet, gentlemanly and respected teacher.

 

Robinson, John Andrew (4/3/1864 - 3/9/1915)

Born Peterborough on 4/3/1864 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in May 1885. In 1896 he came to the Cape of Good Hope to take part in the Rinderpest Campaign and was stationed at the Victoria Compound in Kimberley under Robert Koch. His appointment as Assistant Veterinary Surgeon to the Cape of Good Hope Government however, only dated from 11/4/1897. In 1908 he was stationed at Kingwilliamstown. In 1911 he was transferred to the Grootfontein School of Agriculture at Middelburg, Cape where he lectured Veterinary Science to the Agricultural students. He died at Grootfontein on 3/9/1915. His son E.M. Robinson also qualified as a veterinarian (MRCVS (1912) as well as his grandson J.E. Robinson (BVSc Onderstepoort 1949). In 1910/11 in East London he was earning £430 per annum.

 

Robinson, John Eric (18/4/1925 - 28/6/1988)

Born in Pretoria on 18/4/1925 the son of Prof. E.M. Robinson (MRCVS) and grandson of Ja. Robinson (MRCVS) he qualified as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort at the end of 1949. Immediately thereafter he joined the Rhodesian Veterinary Deprtment and was stationed at Sinoia from 1950 to 1959, Chipinga from 1959 to 1964 and in Salisbury as assistant to the Director. He also served as Provincial Veterinary Officer, Fort Victoria. In 1966 he was appointed Director of Wildlife and Parks which position he held until 1967 when he returned to the Veterinary Department. In the early 1980's he returned to South Africa.

He was killed in a motor accident on the night of 28/6/1988 when returning to his home in Cape Town on completion of a two month game cropping inspection operation in the Karoo for the Directorate of Veterinary Services. The accident occurred between Worcester and Cape Town.

 

Robinson, John Marshall (1878 - 11/4/1937)

Very little is known about this man other than that he came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary surgeon (registered) attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He did not return to England after the war, but opened a private practice in Pretoria. On 16/2/1903 he attended the inaugural meeting of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association as the representative of the private veterinarians. He died in Pretoria on 11/4/1937 at the age of 59 years.

 

Robinson, Maurice Connell (14/5/1903 - 26/3/1978)

Born on 14/5/1903 in Johannesburg, he attended King Edward School in that city and qualified as a veterinarian by obtaining the BVSc degree at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, Onderstepoort in December 1928.

After qualifying he joined the State Serve and saw service as a Government Veterinary Officer at Umtata and Nongoma. In 1930 he married his Onderstepoort classmate, Miss Joan Morice and joined her in private practice in Johannesburg. He and his wife continued together in practice until 1935 when the practice closed and he joined the Municipal Service of Johannesburg as Veterinary Officer at the Newton Abattoir. His wife died on 24/11/1944.

"Mike" Robinson finally retired from the Johannesburg Municipal Service in 1960 and settled in Umkomaas, Natal where he died on 26/3/1978. After his death his body was cremated and his ashes strewn over the garden of 9 Edinburgh Street, Umkomaas.

During world War II he saw service in the S.A.V.C. as a Captain and it is of interest to record that he was due to sail on the Mule ship to India which was subsequently torpedoed on 3/9.1943 and in which Major A.M. Howie MRCVS lost his life. Only the night before he was due to sail was he replaced by Major Howie.

 

Robinson, Percival James (1889 - 14/6/1949)

He was not a qualified veterinarian although he was subsequently registered under the Veterinary surgeons Act of 1933. He started his practice in Newlands (Cape) in 1919 and eventually established the Blue Cross Veterinary Hospital there in 1933. He sold his practice to C.H. Basson in 1946 when he retired. He died in June 1949 aged 60 years. He was cremated and his ashes strewn in the back garden of the Blue Cross Hospital. It is related of Robinson that he thought little of qualified veterinarians because of one asking him why he placed fresh grass in a bottle of ticks he was collecting for a friend. His reply was "Don't they teach you young men anything - I give them the grass so that they won't die of starvation".

 

Roe, John Edward Riley O.B.E. ( - 18/4/1981)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17/12/1937. During world War II he trained officers for the King's African Rifles in Kenya, then after service in Abyssinia he joined the 2nd Nigeria Regiment. Subsequently he saw service as a Veterinary Officer, Senior Veterinary Officer and Deputy Director in Uganda until promoted to Director of Veterinary Services in the Bechuanaland Protectoirate in 1949. As such he was resident in Mafeking until his transfer to Tanganyika as Director of Veterinary Services there in 1955. When this country became independent in 1962 he returned to England and was employed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Sussex and Wales. During his stay in Bechuanaland he was instrumental in designing and erecting the major Foot and Mouth disease control fences (Debeeti, Central Ngwato, Makalamabedi and Kuku and quarantine camps (Makalamabedi, Debeeti, Kuki, Makoba and Dukwe). He was succeeded as Director by K. Unsworth. He die din England on 18/4/1981.

 

Rose, Allan Graham (5/4/1944 - 11.2.1989)

Born in Manzini, Swaziland on 5/4/1944, he qualified as a veterinarian (BVSc) at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort at the end of 1967 after attending school at Treverton and Michaelhouse (BVSc Hons 1979). Thereafter he practiced for a while in England and spent two years in Calgary, Canada. He finally settled in practice in Johannesburg in 1970. He married Miss Dempster in 1973. Of this marriage two sons were born viz. aton and Richard. He died on 11/2/1989 from a Metastatic Melanocarcinoma.

 

Rose, Charles (1868 - 11/9/1939)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 10/4/1888 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 15/11/1899 to 2/7/1903. After service he returned to England. He was commissioned in 1891 and retired in 1912. During 1914 he was recalled from the reserve of officers and saw service in France from August 1914 until April 1915. After a further period of service in the U.K. he was finally retired on grounds of ill health in 1916. He died on 11/9.1939.

 

Ross, Kenneth Andrew (4/1/1917 - 18/7/1982)

Born in Cockermouth, Cumberland on 4/1/1917 he qualified MRCVS at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh on 14/7/1938. After qualifying he undertook a junior lectureship in Bacteriology, Pathology and Meat Inspection. From 1940 to 1943 he saw service in the Royal Air Force. Thereafter he appears to have moved around a great deal and to have undertaken many and varied forms of employment. Some of these were:

1943 - 1945 practiced in London and Kent.

1947 - 1950 Government Veterinary Officer Rhodesia and Basutoland.,

1950 - 1951 State Veterinarian, Kokstad (attended Natal Branch SAVA meeting Pietermaritzburg 4/7/1950).

1955 - 1957 Veterinary Surgeon to the Straite Racing Association Malaya.

1957 - 1958 Study tour U.S.A.

1958 - 1959 Pfizer Laboratories Kenya.

1960 - 1967 Bulawayo

1967 - 1978 F.A.O. Rome. Posted to North Yemen, Somalia, Western Samoa, S/W Pacific, New Hebrides.

1978 Practiced Kayalami, Alberton and Johanesburg.

He died on 18/7.1982 at the Mill Park Hospital, Johannesburg and was cremated.

On 8/8/1985 the author telephoned Jock Hodkin who told him that K.A. Ross was a very small man with a peculiar mouth. Very English. He never paid his debts. Mr Kumm, a Senior Stock Inspector at Kokstad, confirmed that Ross at Kokstad in 1954 was also short and never paid his debts. He was always drunk and used to take the vaccine order money out of the office safe to buy liquor. He would then have to borrow to make up the deficiency. He also used to go on holiday to the Cape and to the Drakensberg for weekends in his G.G. vehicle. His simply disconnected the speedometer to avoid being caught.

Ross was dismissed from the service after a visit to Pretoria with C. Flight. It appears he misbehaved in Pretoria and en route (probably drunk). According to Mr Schweppenhauzer, a smear examiner who served at Kokstad at the time, they used to find Ross dead drunk in his chair when the office opened in the morning.

 

Rossiter Lancelot William M.B.E. (18/11/1907 - 1/2/1981)

Born on 18/11/1907 at Ermelo, he only took up veterinary studies two years after leaving school. He thereafter entered the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort in 1927 and graduated BVSc in June 1932. The reason for qualifying in June 1932 is that he, W.S.B. Clapham and W.G. Barnard had to rewrite surgery which they failed at the final year exam in December 1931. In July 1932 he was appointed to the Division of Veterinary Services and stationed at Allerton Laboratory, Pietermaritzburg. Thereafter he served as Government Veterinary Officer at Ladysmith (Natal) and Nongoma (1937). From November 1939 to September 1940 he served on secondment in Tanganyika on Rinderpest control. During World War II he saw active service in the SAVC and was involved with transportation of mules to India for the British Army. He was also involved with the capture of Madagascar by the south African forces. He served on numerous Foot and Mouth disease campaigns at Bushbuck Ridge while stationed at Barberton and Ermelo where he lived for 10 years. He served 5 years as Government Veterinary Officer, Grahamstown. In 1965 he was promoted to Assistant Director in charge of the Natal Region, which post he held until he retired in 1972. After retirement he took up temporary appointment for 3 years with the Division of Veterinary Services as Veterinary Meat Inspector at Pietermaritzburg Abattoir. He died on 1/2/1981 aged 73 years at Pietermaritzburg. For his services during World War II he was awarded the M.B.E. (Military Division). He was a keen cricketer, rugby and bowls player and an excellent horseman as well as an active Rotarian and member of old soldiers' organisations.

 

Rowe, James (1848 - 4/10/1930)

Born on 7/2/1844 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 21/4/1869 and saw service in south Africa as a regular A.V.D. officer from 31/3/1886 to 13/3/1892. During this period he held the post of S.V.O. (later P.V.O.) of the A.V.D. with headquarters in Pietermaritzburg having succeeded J.C. Berne as S.V.O. On his return to England he in turn was succeeded as S.V.O. by F.F. Crawford. In 1888 he gave evidence before the Stock Commission which was formed to investigate the best means of improving of breeding of cattle and horses in Natal. In his evidence he appears to be the first person to draw attention to the need to stable horses to avoid them contracting horsesickness. He died at Balham on 21/3/1930.

 

Rowston, W.N.

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 19/12/1900 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Ruddock, H.S.

As a veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1892 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 2nd Mounted Rifles. He took part in the action at the siege of Elands River.

 

Rudolph, Brian Peter (26/4/1940 - 8/10/1971)

Born on 16/4/1940 at Pretoria he qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1965. After qualifying he opened a private practice in Kempton Park, but after only six years in practice, was killed in a motor accident near Kempton Park on 8/10/1971.

 

Runciman, Ben ( - 27/11/1958)

The son of a veterinary surgeon and with two brothers who were also veterinary surgeons, he qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 28/5/1900. He came to South Africa as a C.V.S. attached to the Army Veterinary Department during the Boer War and saw service as Veterinary Officer to the South African Constabulary from 21/1/1902 to 1/7/1906. After his discharge he set up an equine practice in Johannesburg, but for a time also practiced at Epsom in England. During World War I he served as a Captain in the S.A.V.C. He died in Tanganyika on 27/11/1958.

 

Russel, John A. ( - 24/2/1908)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in December 1899 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in south Africa from 2/11/1901 to 1/4/1903. He returned to England after his service and died at Rathmines on 24/2/1908.

 

Russel, WilIiam Edward (28/8/1869 - 22/6/1903)

Born on 28/8/1869, he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 23/5/1894 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 28/11/1901 to 6/1/1903. After service he returned to England. He died in Barbera, Aden on 22/6/1903 from Enteric Fever.

 

Rutherford, Charles, C.B. C.M.G. (1858 - 2/4/1922)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 16/4/1879 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service in South Africa on two occasions viz. from 1881 to 1882 and from 1884 to 1885. On both occasions he was stationed in Natal. On 19 and 20/8.1885, an article written by him entitled "Horsesickness in South Africa" was published in the Cape Times. N this article he stated that he was of the opinion that Horsesickness and anthrax are one disease, but that four forms thereof exist viz. the acute, dikop, blue tongue and bilious forms. This theory was considered of such importance that the whole article was republished in Natal GN 44/1886 on 21/1/1886. At the time the article was written he was serving with the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons in Pietermaritzburg.

Together with Francis Duck, A.H. Gentle, Cox, Rangeley and Brown he took part in the Warren Expedition to Bechuanaland in 1884 - 1885. He died on 2/4/1922. In a talk given to the Norfolk and Eastern Counties Association and published in the Veterinary Journal, he states that he was in south Africa for 5 ½ years.

 

Ryan, Hugh Thomas D.S.O. (1876 - 12/8.1936)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15/7/1898 and during the Boer War saw service in south Africa for an unknown period of time as a Veterinary Surgeon in the A.V.D. having arrived in Cape Town aboard the "Nile" from Buenos Airies with a shipload of horses. He was also stationed in America during the Boer War purchasing horses. From 1905 to 1909 he saw service in India (Quetta and Karachi). From 1909 to 1914 he was stationed at Curragh, Fermoy and Ballincollig in Ireland. During World War I he was stationed at the Veterinary hospital at Dieppe where he was awarded the D.S.O. After the war he went into private practice, but retired due to ill health in 1934. He died in 1936 at the Bon Secour Home, Cork, Ireland.

 

Sanderson, Charles Jesse (1868 - 29/3/1956)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14/12/1898 and saw service in South Africa with the New Zealand Mounted Rifles during the Boer War from 21/6/1900. Curson records that on 23/10.1900 he joined the Transvaal Constabulary (which later became the South African Constabulary) as Principal Veterinary Officer and served in this capacity until 5/7/1907. He thereafter proceeded to Australia. This information may not be correct, because Col. Sanderson appears on a photograph taken in front of the main building at Onderstepoort (which was erected in 1908). Also in the photograph is W.. Andrews who only obtained his MRCVS in 1910. Sanderson must therefore have left South Africa much later than claimed by Curson.

It is recorded that he became Veterinary Officer in charge of tick eradication in Australia and contacted sir Arnold Theiler when the latter visited Australia in 1928. He died in Sydney NSW Australia on 29/3/1956 aged 88 years.

 

Sandrock, Theodor Heinrich (9/10/1908 - 27/9/1940)

Born on 9/10/1908 at Padang in Sumatra he went to school in Holland and subsequently studied medicine there. However, in 1933 he relinquished these studies in favour of the veterinary course at Onderstepoort. He graduated from the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1937 and immediately took up an appointment as GVO Dundee. Later he served at Vryburg. In 1938 he married. In 1939 he underwent an operation for appendicitis, but due to a delay in the operation he suffered complications which lead to his death on 27/9/1940.

 

Sartin, William Dawson (1848 - 4/4/1882)

Born 1848 he qualified MRCVS (London) in April 1869 and with his regiment saw service in South Africa from 1881 -1882. He died at sea on 4/4/1882.

 

Sawyer, Henry Thomas ( - 15/3/1955)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 10/5/1893 as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service with the A.V.D. in south Africa from 22/10/1899 to 30/6/1902 with the 12th Lancers in Lord Methven's force at Modder River. After the war he returned to England. He subsequently rose to the rank of Major General and was for a time Director General of the A.V.S. He died at Liss, Hants on 15/3/1955.

 

Scarlett, Herbert (1865 - 14/1/1933)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 20/12/1888 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Hastings, Susses on 14/1/1933 at the age of 68 years.

 

Schatz, Walter Heinz Gerhard (4/3/1914 - 16/9/1962)

Born Usakos on 4/3/1914 he graduated BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty Onderstepoort in 1939. He joined the Division of Veterinary Services in 1940 and was stationed at Allerton Laboratory from March 1940 to September 1943. He was then transferred to South West Africa where he was stationed at Windhoek until august 1947 and Omaruru until 1956. After 1956 he returned to Windhoek, but due to poor health was sent to Cape Town where he died on 16/9/1962.

 

Scheuber, Josef Remegius (1892 - 8/12/1975)

Born in Stands, Switzerland in 1892 he passed his Staatsexamen (Zurich) in 1918 and obtained his Dr Med Vet at the same university in 1920. After qualifying, he was appointed to the Department of Agriculture by Sir Arnold Theiler and together with E.M. Robinson he served at allerton Laboratory from 1921 to 1923. Thereafter he and Robinson both proceeded to Onderstepoort where they worked together in the Department of Bacteriology until his retirement in 1952. For many years he lectured in bacteriology to the veterinary students at Onderstepoort. During his lifetime he could read and write Latin. He died after many years of retirement in Pretoria on 8/12/1975. His funeral service was conducted by his son, Father R.A. Schuber O.M.I.

 

Schmid, Karl Gerhard (25/7/1883 - 24/4/195)

Born in Leidringen (Germany) on 25/7.1883 he was educated at Herrenberg, Blaubeuren and Rottweil. It has no been confirmed as to when and where he qualified as a veterinarian, but in all probability he received the Dr Med Vet degree from the University of Stuttgard in 1905. In July 1910 he was appointed District Veterinary Surgeon by the German Administration in South West Africa and place din charge of the districts of Grootfontein, Otjiwarango and Outjo. During World War I he was attached to the first Field Company of the Schutztruppe and took part in the action at Sandfontein, Kakamas, Trekkopje and Otavi. With the surrender of the German Forces in S.W.a. in July 1917, he, together with all other reservists, was released and allowed to return to his farm. Officers were allowed to take their arms, ammunition and horses with them. Schmid always considered this a very chivalrous treatment by General Botha In 1918 all German Government Officials were repatriated to Germany. Only a few days before Schmid was due to leave for Germany, permission was obtained for him, as well as veterinarians Maag and Sigwart, to remain in South West Africa. At that time there were no Civil Veterinarians in the country. When a Civil Administration was introduced in 1922, Major Goodall the P.V.O. for S.W.A. appointed Schmid, Maag and Sigwart to the service. These men had to use their own transport and only in 1926 was official transport provided. He subsequently served as Government Veterinary Officer at Omaruru (1922 - 1936) and at Ohahandja from 1936 until he retired in 1954. He died there on 24/4/1959. His grandson R.E. Schmid qualified as a veterinarian at the University of Pretoria in 1980.

 

Schoeman, Johannes Hendrick (19/6/1907 - 9/3/1967)

Born Schoemanshoek, Oudtshoorn on 19/6/1907 he obtained his BSc degree at Stellenbosch University in 1927 and his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1932. After qualifying he joined the Division of Veterinary Services and served as Government Veterinary Officer at Umtata, Armoesvlakte and Vryheid. He then resigned from the service and practiced in Johannesburg, Springs (18 years), Potgietersrust (3 years) and Letsitele (7 years) where he also farmed with citrus. He took a great interest in flying and boating. He died of a heart attack while travelling by car between Gravelotte and Letsitele on 9/3/1967.

 

Schofield, William Ernest O.B.E. (1878 – 18/7/1943)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 19/7/1901 and served in South Africa for an unknown period of time with the Army Veterinary Department during the Boer War. He subsequently returned to South Africa for a second tour of duty from 16/5/1903 to 22/1/1908. He died on 18/7/1943 aged 65 years.

 

Schroeder, J. ( - 1858)

After obtaining his MRCVS (London) in May 1812 he joined the 21st Light Dragoons and with his regiment served at the Cape from 1813 to 1817 having succeeded W. Levett as veterinarian in 1813. After 1817 there was no veterinarian at the Cape until the appointment of W.J. Kingsley in 1840 (a void of 23 years). He died in 1858.

 

Schultz, Prof. Kunibert Carl August (9/1/1900 – 4/8/1984)

Born on 9/1/1900 at Bethanien in the district of Edenburg (O.F.S.) of missionary (Berlin Mission Society) parents he attended junior school at Bethanien from 1906 to 1911 and thereafter received his senior school training at Grey College, Bloemfontein where he matriculated in 1918. Subsequently he obtained a BSc degree at Grey University (University of the O.F.S.) in 1921. In 1925 he qualified as a veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort. Immediately after qualifying he joined the State service as Government Veterinary Officer and saw service at the following places:

1926 - March 1930: Otjiwarango

1931 - Unknown

31/1/1932 - February 1932: Onderstepoort

March 1932 – 1935: Kimnberley

1935 : Cape Town

1936 - 1963: Onderstepoort

1964 - 1970: Vrolykheid Research Station (Nature Conservtion (Cape))

On 13th June 1934 when visiting a Mr Loots on a farm outside Danielskuil in the Barkley West district he was severely wounded in the jaw by a rifle shot. The circumstances of the shooting were as follows:

During early June Mr Loots had been fined for not destroying a Dourine infected horse on his property. At the same time the court ordered Dr Schultz to destroy the animal as soon as possible. On arriving on the property concerned, he and his police escort found the Loots family waiting for them. Mrs Loots in particular, was most excited. The woman (Mr Loots' daughter) to whom the horse belonged was not on the farm, having walked to Danielskuil that day.

When the reason for the visit was explained, Mr Loots left the room and returned with a Martini Henry rifle. When the situation was again explained to him he put the rifle away. The owner of the horse had by then returned ad she was handed a note stating that she had handed the horse over against her will and that should a court subsequently rule on her behalf, she would be paid compensation. The situation was suddenly upset by her sister running into the room shouting "Remember Slagtersnek", whereupon the note was thrown at the official party's feet.

Reluctantly Dr Schultz and the party moved towards the stable. As they crept through a fence en route, a shot rang out. A police constable dropped to the ground and lay quiet. The sergeant tried to extract his revolver when a second shot rang out and the revolver dropped. By now Mr Loots was seen to be armed with a shotgun and a .22 rifle. The sergeant and Schultz ran for cover behind a low dam wall. However, the cover was not sufficient and Mr Loots continued to fire at them. In the act of moving to a safer place, Schultz was shot through the jaw. Thereafter no more shots were fired. He was then taken to Danielskuil to receive medical attention. The police constable who had dropped to the ground was unharmed. Schultz had difficulty in breathing and requested a Tracheotomy. This was not done until a doctor from Postmasburg (35 miles away) arrived. He was then transferred to a small hospital in Postmasburg where he was expected to die. The same evening the horse was shot without further resistance. A week later, Dr Schultz with his shattered lower jaw was airlifted to Cape Town in the "Andromeda". He remained in the Volks Hospital for six weeks for the bone splinters to fester out of the wound.

Subsequently he travelled to London where his jaw was rebuilt from a section of his pelvis by Sir Harold Gilles. On 8/2/1936 he boarded the steamship "Adolf Woermann" to return to South Africa. He recommended duties in the Department of Pathology at Onderstepoort on 31/3/1936. Mr and Mrs Loots were subsequently sentenced by the High Court in Kimberley to two years imprisonment as conspirators. The daughter was sentenced to 3 ½ years imprisonment for not handing over her horse. The son who had done the shooting was never bought to trial. His decomposed and headless body was found in a cave nearby in February 1939. Mr and Mrs Loots snr. Died in prison. The elder sister ("Remember Slagtersnek") died before the trial. It was only four years later that Dr Schultz's medical expenses were paid for by the Department and then only after a long struggle on his behalf by the SAVMA and members of Parliament. For the remainder of his service, Dr Schultz lectured in Pathology at the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort and subsequently became head of that department. He died at his home in Pretoria on the 4th August 1984 aged 84 years.

 

Schurmann, Johan Gustav ( - 21/11/1978)

He qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1962. The author was unsuccessful in his attempts to attain details on the life of Schurmann from his relatives. He is reported to have died of a heart attack at Delmas.

 

Scott, James Francis ( - 13/11/1925)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 23/5/1895. In 1898 he came to Johannesburg and went into partnership with T.A. Britton (formerly of Port Elizabeth). At times he did work for Sir Arnold Theiler in Johannesburg. Amongst other things he attended the horses of the Staatsartillerie and kept an eye over Daspoort when Theiler proceeded overseas for four months (May to September 1899). By the time Theiler returned he had been dismissed by the Artillerie. He died on 13/11/1925. After the formation of the Transvaal Volunteer Corps in 1902 he was the first veterinarian appointed to it. He served as Veterinary Officer (Captain) to the right wing of the Imperial Light Horse Regiment.

 

Scott, William ( - 1917)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 27/7/1883 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died in 1917.

 

Sellers, Alfred Joseph ( - 4/6/1935)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 14/12/1895 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Sharp, Frank William D.S.O. ( - 24/3/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 3/1/1881 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 30/10/1899 to 21/2/1903. After the war he returned to England. He died at Clyst Hydon, Devon on 24/3/1932.

 

Sharpe, Cecil Molesworth (27/3/1876 – 24/12/1945)

Born on 27/3/1876 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 13/7/1899 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department to take part in the Boer War. In 1900 he was invalided "home ill" for a while. He was however not commissioned. After his discharge from the army on 11/11/1902, he joined the Natal Civil Veterinary Department where he remained until 1907. (In 1904 he was stationed at Verulam as District Veterinarian). In 1907 he set up practice in Pietermaritzburg and remained there until he died on 24/12/1945. (He was buried on Christmas Day 1945).

During World War I he saw active service in the South West Africa Campaign as a Captain in the SAVC. It is recorded that he played rugby for the 1st Middelsex County team during 1896 and 1897.

 

Sharrer, H.

He is recorded has having worked as a veterinarian in South Africa prior to 1921 when he returned to Switzerland.

 

Shaw, George Kelso (1/1/1891 – 14/1/1981)

He qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 10/7/1915 and in 1954 was living at Sundale, Hilton Road, Natal as a retired Major in the RAVC. He served as President of the Natal Branch of the SAVA during the periods 1953/54 and 1954/55. He died on 14/1/1981 aged 90 years.

 

Shepherd, Joseph Hutchinson ( - 31/1/1953)

Born in Hertford he qualified MRCVS (London) on 11/5/1893 and came to South Africa during 1900. He was involved with Rinderpest control in the Cape Colony. In 1901 he returned to Guildford where he practiced until 1933. He died on 31/1/1953.

 

Sheppard, Mervyn Wellesley ( - 22/12/1925)

Born in the Thabanchu district he qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 19/7/1921 when he won the 2nd Fitzwygram prize for that year. In 1924 he was stationed at Allerton Laboratory where he served under D.T. Mitchell. The same year he was appointed lecturer in Pharmacology at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort, but prior to taking up his appointment he was sent to England to do a refresher course. However, he never returned from England, because a body was washed up on the Cornish Coast with clothes bearing a laundry mark which could be traced to him. A subsequent inquest ruled that he had died either from accidental or suicidal drowning. In his will he left a sum of £500 to Miss I Jackson who was working at Allerton Laboratory. It is reported that with her legacy she purchased a Chrysler Tourer. His lectureship at Onderstepoort was subsequently taken up by Dr P.J.J. Fourie. W.H. Andrews who knew him well, never believed in his death. He claimed that he had seen Sheppard in London several years later, but that the person concerned had denied that he was Sheppard.

 

Shelston, Arthur Wilfred (1885 – 6/7/1919)

Born in 1885 he qualified MRCVS (London) in July 1908 and it is recorded that he served at Allerton Laboratory from 1909 to 1914. During 1912 to 1914 he was in charge of the laboratory, having taken over from Herbert Watkins-Pitchford after his resignation in 1912. He was succeeded as head of Allerton Laboratory by D.T. Mitchell in 1914 when he left South Africa to take up an appointment as Assistant to Col. Holmes at the Imperial Bacteriological Laboratory at Muktesar, India.

While investigating an outbreak of Glanders on 17/6/1919 he became infected and died from the disease on 6/7/1919.

 

Shore, Frederick Herbert (1874 – 12/11/1908)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) in May 1895 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Natal) from 16/4/1897 to 23/2/1903. He was Veterinary Officer to the 18th Hussars and was captured by the Boer forces and confined at the Waterval Prison camp near Pyramids, Pretoria. This camp has previously been the site of Sir Arnold Teiler's stables for his laboratory in 1897. After service he returned to England. He die on 12/11/1908 at the age of 34 years from chronic alcoholism.

 

Short, Frederick John (1858 – 1/3/1937)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 3/7/1879 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 19/10/1901 to 9/6/1902. After the war he returned to England. He died in Torquay on 1/3/1937 aged 79 years.

 

Sigwart, Hans (1885 – 7/6/1949)

Born in 1885 in Germany he qualified as a Veterinary Surgeon at Stuttgart University in 1908 and obtained his Dr Med Vet in 1911. In 1912 he came to South West Africa and was appointed District Veterinary Surgeon, Otjiwarango and Outjo by the German Administration. During World War I he served with the "Schutztruppe". After the war all the German officials in the territory were repatriated to Germany except for the three veterinarians, viz H. Sigwart, A. Maag and G. Schmid. On the appointment of A Goodall in succession to Col. G.W. Lee as Senior Veterinary Officer in charge of South West Africa in 1920 these three men were taken in the Veterinary Department in 1922. From 1922 to 1940 he served as District Veterinary Surgeon at Okahandja, Keetmanshoop, Grootfontein and Gobabis. During World War II he was interned for a period of five years. During this time his wife died. After World War II he was re-instated in the Veterinary Department and was posted to Windhoek where he served until shortly before his death at Swakopmund on 7/6/1949.

 

Simpson, Frederick Charles ( - 18/5/1950)

He was not a qualified veterinarian but obtained registration as a veterinarian in the Colony of Natal Veterinary Board Examination on 16/2/1904. During the greater part of the Boer War he served as a Trooper I the Natal Police. As this force was without a Regimental V.O., Simpson acted as such and drew "extra duty pay" for the work. On 4/3/1904 he was issued with a "Certificate in Veterinary Medicine and Surgery" by the Board and his name was placed on the Veterinary Surgeon's Register of the Natal Colony. It must be recorded that his examination was the First Veterinary Examination to be written in South Africa and took place at Allerton Laboratory on 16/2/1904. His examination was set by H. Watkins-Pitchford FRCVS and C.H. Cordy who also signed his Certificate of Competence on behalf of the Veterinary Board., With the implementation of the Veterinary Surgeons Act of 1933 (Act No. 16 of 1933) he registered under that Act and at the time was living at 275 Church Street, Pretoria. During World War I he proceeded to England and served with the RAVC.

 

Simpson, Leonard Arthur (1926 - 11/4/1980)

After qualifying as a midshipman from the General Botha training ship he joined the Royal Navy and saw active wartime service with the Natal Convoys carrying supplies to Russia during World War II. During one such convoy he lost an eye and for the rest of his life wore a glass eye. After the war he proceeded to the Ondertepoort Veterinary Faculty where he obtained the BVSc degree in December 1950.

He subsequently established an equine practice on the Rand for some years, but gave it up later on to work for the Veterinary Division for a while. He then worked on many projects amongst them being veterinarian to the producers of the film Zulu Dawn. He died in Durban on 11/4/1980 as a result of a suicide pact with his wife. She survived the overdose of Barbiturates taken, but he did not.

 

Simpson, William Alexander (1879 - 7/4/1939)

Born at Kilkerran, Ayrshire, he qualified MRCVS (London) on 16/7/1903. On 6 October 1906 he joined the Cape Government Veterinary Department and saw service as Government Veterinary Officer at Vryburg (1908), Mafeking, Cradock and Queenstown. He remained in service at Queenstown until his death on 7/4/1939. In 1912 he was awarded the FRCVS for his thesis entitled "Bovine Pleuropneumonia: Lungsickness". Still in Vryburg during 1910/11 he was earning £350 p.a. then he went to Cradock after the establishment of Union.

 

Skues, Frederic MacKenzie (9/7/1866 - 18/8/1921)

Born in upper Holloway, London on 9/7/1866 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 16/7/1897 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. during the Boer War. On 26/9/1905 he joined the Civil Veterinary Department of the Orange Free State Colony as District Veterinary Officer in charge of Bethlehem (H.Q.) Lindley and Harrismith. In World War I he saw active service in the South West Africa Campaign as a Captain in the SAVC when for a time he was stationed at Fort Napier in Pietermaritzburg He died while serving as Government Veterinary Officer at Bloemfontein on 18/8/1921.

 

Small, John P. (1878 - 3/5/1955)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 26/5/1900 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa or an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 3/5/1955 aged 77 years.

 

Smart, Alfred C.

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 31/3/1896 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. On 22/5/1939 the RCVS was informed that he was "deceased".

 

Smith, Charl du Toit (10/12/1951 - 25/11/1985)

He qualified as a veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1977 and served as State Veterinarian at Otavi until 1984 when he transferred to Windhoek. He died from a heart attack while asleep on the night of 25/11/1985.

 

Smith, Charles Edward ( - 29/6/1916)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in April 1877 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Ramsgate on 29/6/1916.

 

Smith, Major General Sir Frederick K.C.M.G. (1857 - 27/7/1929)

Born in 1857 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 3/4/1876 (FRCVS on 16/1/1893). After qualifying he joined the British Army (R.A.) in 1876 and from 1878 to 1885 saw service in India (from 1880 with 12th Lancers). Form 1886 he was attached to the Army Veterinary School, Aldershot and became a professor in 1887. In 1892 he transferred to the remount Department. He served in the Nile expedition of 1898. He came to south Africa as a regular A.V.D. officer on 10/11/1899 and remained until 2/10/1905.

For the period 1903 to 1905 he served as Principal Veterinary Officer (P.V.O.) with headquarters in the Artillary Barracks Pretoria in succession to I. Matthews. He in turn was succeeded as P.V.O. by J.A. Nunn. After his return to England he was, in 1907, appointed Director General of the Army Veterinary Service. He retired in 1910. After retirement he dedicated himself to writing and from that date until 1925 wrote 150 papers and books. Amongst these was the history of the RAVC and the "Veterinary History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902". He died at St Leonard, Sussex on 27/7/1929.

 

Smith, William Dunlop C.M.G., D.S.O. (14/8/1865 - 10/2/1940)

Born at Armagh on 14/8/1865 he qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 24/5/1888 and saw service as a regular officer in the A.V.D. in South Africa from 15/7/1899 to 29/1/1903. For most of his service he was attached to the Protectorate Regiment as Veterinary Officer with headquaters at Mafeking. It is recorded that on 12/5/1900 he and two fellow officers were captured when the Fort at Mafeking was overrun by General Eloff's forces, during a daring daylight raid. While a prisoner f the Boers he attended to the Boer wounded on Eloff's reqest for assistance. He was released when the Boers retreated from Mafeking. He was besieged for 6 ½ months in Mafeking with Bden Powell's forces

After he returned to England he rose to the rank of Director General of the A.V.S. (in succession t Sir Layton Blenkinsop) in 1921 and retired from the British Army in 1925 after a distinguished career. He died on 10/2/1940.

Prior to coming to South Africa he took part in the expedition to Dongola (1896) and the Battle of Khartoum (1898). During World War I he saw active service in France as a Lieut. Col. From 1914 to 1917. for his services he was awarded the D.S.O. and C.M.G. (August 1918).

 

Smith, Phillip Rudolph Botha (11/4/1899 - 18/6/1962)

Born in Ficksburg on 11/4/1899 he graduated D.V.M. from Cornell University in June 1923. After qualifying he entered the Division of Veterinary Services and served as Government Veterinary Officer at Richmond (Natal), Vryheid, Pretoria (17/1/1927 - ?), Aliwal North, Umtata (2/10/1931 - 1934) and allerton Laboratory (1934 - 1944). In 1944 he resigned from the service and practiced in Durban until he died in 1962. His son P.R.B. smith Jnr. Qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1950.

During his young days he played soccer for the Orange Free State first provincial under 19 team. He also played first team for Stellenbosch University, but broke his back. In 1922 he was the first South African to play in an all American soccer team, and in 1923 he captained the team.

 

Snyman, Jan Hendrik Dykman ( - 21/8/1978)

He qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1948. The author has been unsuccessful in attaining details of his life from relatives.

 

Snyman, Phillippus Stefanus (22/9/1898 - 21/6/1971)

Born on 22/9/1898 in Heidelberg, Transvaal he qualified BVSc with the first group of students at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1924. In 1940 he obtained the DVSc degree for his thesis on Rabies.

In 1925 he joined the Division of Veterinary Services and served as Government Veterinary Officer at Nongoma, Durban (Meat Inspection) and Greytown (20/6/1927). From 1929 to 1934 he was attached to the Research Institute at Onderstepoort where he also served as a lecturer. Thereafter he returned to field duties and served as Sub-Director in charge of the Orange Free State from 1934 to 1946 and Assistant Director for the Transvaal region from 1946 until his promotion to Director of Field Services. He retired in 1959. After his retirement, he farmed in the Greytown district of Natal, but due to ill health he gave up farming and moved to Pietermaritzburg where he died a few months later on 21/6/1971.

 

Soga, Jotello Festire (1865 - 6/12/1906)

Born in the Cape Colony, the 4th son of the Reverend Tiyo Soga, a Xhosa and a Scots mother (Janet Burnside), he was the first South African born man to qualify as a veterinarian. It is recorded that he entered the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh in 1881 and obtained his MRCVS in April 1886. After qualifying he returned to South Africa and on 1/11/1889 he was appointed as Duncan Hutcheon's (P.V.O. Cape Colony) second assistant (J.D. Borthwick was the first) and served as a District Veterinarian in many places in the Cape Colony. The hard and dangerous work he undertook in combating Rinderpest by the "stamping out" process caused a deterioration in his health and he was forced to resign from the service in 1899. He died on 6/12/1906 on Mr A.P. Fitchett's farm, Amalinda was buried at Amalinda.

 

Somers, Henry L. (1862 - 14/5/1938)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 2 April 1885 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Middlehouse, Dorking on 14/5/1938 aged 76 years.

 

Souter, Edward Strachan

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 20/12/1900 and during the Boer War saw service in south Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Southey, James Brenchley (1873 - 6/9/1909)

Born in 1873 he qualified MRCVS (London) in May 1895 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 25/9/1899 to 12/9/1901. He returned to South Africa for a second tour of duty from 24/1/1902 to 1/4/1903. He died at Khartoum on 6/9/1909.

 

Sowerby, Maurice Herbert ( - 25/2/1964)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 23/5/1901 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Farnham, Surrey on 25/2/1964.

 

Spanton, J.P.

As a Canadian qualified veterinarian he served in South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He saw service with the Imperial Yeomanry.

 

Spiers, S.

All that is known of this man is that he qualified MRCVS in 1906. (the RCVS have no record of him). He was a member of the old Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association.

 

Spreull, Andrew D.S.O., T.D., D.L. (1877 - 31/12/1953)

This man served as a Trooper in the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry regiment in South Africa during the Boer War. At the time he was a veterinary student. He subsequently returned to England and completed his training (MRCVS) at the RVC London on 18/7/1902. He saw active service again during World War I. During his lifetime he practices in Dundee for 50 years. He died on 31/12/1953 aged 75 years shortly after he retired from active practice.

 

Spreull, James S.H. (12/3/1874 - 4/6/1948)

Born in Dundee, Scotland on 12/3/1874 the son of a veterinary surgeon (Andrew Spreull FRCVS) he qualified MRCS (Edinburgh) on 24/5/1895. In his final year he was awarded the Fitzwygram 3rd prize as the 3rd best veterinary student in the British Isles. On 26/12/1896 he joined the Civil Veterinary Department of the Cape Colony Government on a six month temporary appointment to assist Duncan Hutcheon with the control of Rinderpest. This campaign took him to Barkley West where he destroyed infected herds and then subsequently to Aliwal North and Herschel. It is recorded that on the farm Fonteintjie in the latter district he made the first use of the defibrinated immune blood method of immunisation as invented by Professor Bordel. This method he proved was unsuccessful due to the piroplasm infection of the donor vaccine blood. He also spent a great deal of time at Malmesbury and Eersterivier junction at the anti-Rinderpest serum camp. In May 1898 he was transferred to Kluklu (Fort Beaufort) where he assisted R.W. Dixon in his work on the life history of the blue tick. During 1899 - 1900 he was stationed in Cape Town. In 1908 he was awarded the FRCVS for his thesis "Blue Tongue in South Africa". Having worked at Somerset East on Blue Tongue, he was the first person to produce a vaccine against the disease.

After a study period in England in 1908 he returned to South Africa and was stationed at Umzimkulu to work on East Coast Fever control. In 1912 he was appointed Senior Veterinary Officer in charge of the Transkei. Thereafter he served as Senior Veterinary in charge of the Transvaal from 1916 to 1921 when he transferred to Cape Town as Senior Veterinary Officer in charge of the Cape Western Division until his retirement in March 1934. After his retirement he set up practice in East London and remained there until he died on 4/6/1948, aged 74 years following a hernia operation.

He served as G.V.O. Umzimkulu in 1910/11 and earned £430 p.a.

 

Stableford, John Porter (1876 - 2/5/1936

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 23/5/1901 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 2/5/1936 aged 60 years.

 

Stapley, Walter ( - 22/5/1926)

As a M.D., he also qualified MRCVS (London) on 14/12/1892 and on 21/10/1896 was appointed by the Natal Civil Veterinary Department on the recommendation of the Stock Commission. (The others were Verney, Baxter and J.L. Webb).

For most of his service in Natal he was stationed at Newcastle where he was on charge of the Newcastle, Klip River, Dundee, upper Tugela and Msinga districts. It is recorded that he made the first diagnosis of Rinderpest in Natal, when this disease broke out on the 15th of July 1897, just outside Dundee. During 1898 he published three articles in the Natal Agricultural and Mining Record viz:

1. Mealie poisoning

2. Swallowing foreign bodies by cattle; and

3. Stiff-sick.

He resigned his official appointment in December 1898 and returned to England. He was succeeded as Assistant Veterinary Surgeon at Newcastle by F.H. Hutchinson. He died on 22/5/1926.

 

Starke, Prof. Nevelle Charles (17/2/1899 - 17/6/1988)

Born on the farm Mulders Vlei in the district of Stellenbosch on 17/2/1899, he attended school at Stellenboch until August 1916 when he enlisted for active military service in World War I. He received his basic training at Potchefstroom and was then drafted to the 5th South African Infantry regiment for service in East Africa. After his discharge from the army in 1918, he attended S.A.C.S. in Cape Town where he matriculated in 1920. In 1921 he attended Wits University to do his BVSc entrance exams and in 1923 transferred to Onderstepoort where he obtained his BVSc degree at the end of 1926. During the Fordsburg Riots of 1921, he served with the Transvaal Scottish Regiment and saw a great deal of action.

After qualifying as a veterinarian he was appointed as a GVOI to Bloemfontein on 1/4/1927. Thereafter he received transfer as follows:

Bloemfontein to Bethlehem 30/6/1927; Bethlehem to Pietersburg 21/10/1927; Pietersburg to Duiwelskloof 23/1/1928 (took over from McNae); Duiwelskloof to Ladysmith 19/6/1928.

In July 1929 he married Miss Muriel C. Wilson, a teacher of Pretoria. Thereafter he was stationed at Potchefstroom (5 years) and while there saw Foot and Mouth Disease duties at Ramathlabama during the 1932/33 outbreak in Bechuanaland. He subsequently transferred to Dundee where in September 1937, the diptank assistant at Nadantshane reported that the plowing oxen in his area had gone lame. Although it was a Sunday afternoon when he received the report, he immediately left to examine the cattle and diagnosed Foot and Mouth disease. It was subsequently proved that the infection had been introduced by cattle illegally moved from Bechuanaland where a severe outbreak of the disease had been diagnosed by E.C.S. Dawe at Palapye Station amongst cattle moved from Rakops to the railhead. The outbreak was subsequently controlled by slaughter out with compensation and many hundreds of cattle were shot.

In July 1939 he transferred to Durban in succession to Matthews. There he remained for 18 months before being transferred to Onderstepoort (January 1941) as lecturer in Animal Management and General Hygiene. This post he occupied until 1948 when he transferred to the Department of Surgery as Lecturer in General Surgery under Prof. S.W.J. van Rensburg. When the latter resigned his appointment Starke took over as Professor of Surgery, Gynaecology and Obstetrics. He retired from his official duties in 1959 and thereafter farmed for ± 23 years on his smallholding near Stellenbosch. He moved back to Pretoria in full retirement in 1982. He died there on the 17th of June 1988 aged 89 years.

 

Steck, Werner Dr. Med. Vet.

As a Swiss veterinarian he was employed at Onderstepoort until ± 1928 where he also served as lecturer in Pathology to the Veterinary Faculty. He returned to Switzerland.

 

Steel, Charles Edward

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 28/5/1900 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 2/11/1901 to 30/11/1902. After his service he returned to England.

 

Steel, Lionel George (6/12/1925 - 30/6/1970)

Born in Pietermaritzburg on 6/12/1925 he was educated at Hilton College. After matriculating, he attended the University of Natal for one year prior to joining the UDF during the last year of World War II. He thereafter continued his veterinary studies and qualified as a veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1950. For a while after qualifying he assisted Dr James Dorė in practice in Durban before proceeding to Ingogo where he opened his own practice which covered the Ingogo and Volksrust areas. He subsequently converted to Catholocism and attended the Catholic Seminary in Pretoria, but failed to qualify as a Priest. He continued to assist the church by supervising their farming operations at Pomeroy in Natal. Subsequently he joined the Lesotho Government Veterinary Department but was deported for political reasons. On his way to England he died of a heart attack at Jan Smuts Airport on 30/5/1970.

 

Steel, W.G.

He is recorded as being an A.C.F. Veterinary Officer with the rank of Captain in the South African Light Horse Regiment after 1903 when the Volunteer (ACF) Corps was founded in the Transvaal. A collection of his photographs including ones of the S.A.L.H. Regimental pet baboons Jaco and Krige, is in the possession of the S.A.D.F. archives. These pets served with the S.A.L.H. throughout the ango Boer War. He was an unqualified veterinarian.

 

Stevenson, Gordon Frank

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburg) on 16/12/1889 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. In 1939 he was still in the RAVC (Major OBE) having been stationed at Lucknow in 1936. The Vet Record of April 28,1900 records as follows: "G.F. Steevenson, Gent., to be Veterinary Officer with the rank of Vet.-Lieutenant" to Lord Strathcona's Corps.

 

Steevenson, John Robert D.S.O. (1881 - 24/12/1962)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in December 1893 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he retunred to England. He died on 28/7/1907 aged 35 years.

 

Stephenson, Robert Henry (1873 - 19/3/1930)

I can find no record of this man other than the fact that he was an MRCVS (Edinburgh 20/12/1894) and was employed by the Cape of Good Hope Government as an Assistant Veterinary surgeon from 23/3/1907. He then earned £350 a year. It is not known when he left this employment. He died on 19/3/1930 aged 57 years.

 

Stevens, William Squire (1878 - 25/12/1945)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 19/12/1901 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 25/12/1945 aged 67 years.

 

Stevenson, George Thomas

As an 1897 veterinary graduate of McGill University he served with Strachcona's Horse during the Boer War from 7/3/1900 to 20/1/1901. He took part in engagements at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding, the Defence of Wepener, Vet Rivier, Zandrivier and also served in the Transvaal.

 

Stevenson, William ( - 6/2/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 23/6/1886 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary surgeon in the Army Veterinary Department.

 

Stewart, Charles D. ( - 27/9/1919)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17/7/1897 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 27/9/1919.

 

Steward, H.A. ( - 8/7/1946)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 24/5/1905 and saw service in South Africa in the AVD/AVC from 1/2/1908 to 28/2/1913. He died on 8/7/1946.

 

Stewart, John Livingstone (6/5/1896 - 6/8/1971)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 20/7/1923 and became the second Director of Veterinary Services to the Gold Coast (Ghana) from 1929 to 1949. (W.P. Beal 1909 to 1929 was the first). He is remembered to the Veterinary Research Station which he built at Pong Tamale and for his pioneer work on selective vegetation clearing for Tsetse fly control. After he retired he lived at Magoeba's Kloof until his death there on 6/8/1971.

 

Steyn, Dow Gerbrand (7/3/1898 - 25/7/1988)

Born at Colesberg on 7/3/1898 he obtained a BSc degree at Stellenbosch (1919). Thereafter he qualified as a veterinarian in Vienna (Staatseksamen) 1924 and Dr. Med. Vet. (Pharma) 1925. In 1933 he was awarded the DVSc degree (Pretoria). He then joined the research staff at Onderstepoort. In 1934 he was appointed Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology in which capacity he remained until 1946 when he became head of the Department of Pharmacology at the Medical Faculty of the University of Pretoria. He retired from this post in 1963.

During his professional life he published in excess of 200 articles and wrote two books viz. The Toxicology of Plants South Africa and Vergiftiging van Mens en Dier. He was awarded the following:

1. The Senior Captain Scott Medal by the S.A. Biological Society in 1941.

2. The Havenga prize for medicine by the s.A. Academy for Arts and Science in 1954.

3. The Gold Medal of the SAVA 1975.

4. Honorary Doctorate by the University of Vienna in 1977.

He died in Pretoria on 25/7/1988 aged 90 years.

 

Stockman, Sir Stewart (1869 - 2/6/1926)

Born in 1869 in Edinburgh he qualified MRCVS at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College on 23/12/1890 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. During the war he was Veterinary Officer with the Rhodesian Field Force together with E.B. Kellett J. Peddie and Frank Gregory. After the Boer War he saw service in India, but returned to South Africa in 1903 to take up the post of Principal Veterinary Officer to the newly formed Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department. This post he held until the end of 1904 when he returned to England and was succeeded as P.V.O. Transvaal by C.E. Gray. In England he became Chief Veterinary Officer to the Board of Agriculture in London. He died in Glasgow on 2/6/1926.

Honours bestowed upon him were:

1. K.C.M.G.

2. President RCVS 1923 - 1924.

3. Vice-President RCVS 1909, 1920 - 1921, 1924

4. Member RCVS Council 1905 - 1926

5. John Henry Steel Memorial Medal 1905

 

Stokes, Ernest Vernon (8/4/1867 - 27/11/1925)

Born on 8/4/1867 in Southwark, London he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in June 1899 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. In May 1902 he was in Potchefstroom where he remained until 1905 at the experimental station. At the end of 1905 he commenced practice in Port Elizabeth. On 2/11/1914 he joined the SAVC and saw active service in the South West Africa Campaign. He died in Port Elizabeth on 27/11/1925 at Fairview House, Princess Street.

 

Stokoe, Richard

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17/12/1901 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He remained in South Africa for a while after the Boer War because he is recorded as serving as a member of the Volunteer Corps (A.C.F.) as Veterinary Officer to the left wing of the Imperial Light Horse Regiment from 1902 to 19/6/1903. ON 20/2/1941 he became a voluntary patient in Cambridgeshire Mental Hospital.

 

Stonier, Leslie (6/4/1901 - April 1970)

Born in Cape Town on 6/4/1901 he was a teacher before studying veterinary science at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort. After obtaining his BVSc degree in 1927 he was appointed Government Veterinary Officer on 4/7/1928 at Vryburg (27/8/1928), Allerton Laboratory (1933 - 1935) and Kimberley where he remained until he retired in 1964 and for a year thereafter on a temporary basis. After leaving the Government Service he was employed by the Kimberley City Council on meat hygiene control. He is recorded as being one of the first veterinarians to contract Rift Valley Disease in South Africa. The after effects of which impaired his vision as a result of retinal detachment. He died of a coronary thrombosis a week before his 69th Birthday.

 

Strachan, Charles Hulley (8/10/1883 - 7/10/1947)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21/12/1906. For a short while after qualifying, he served as a Government Veterinary Officer in South Africa but soon relinquished his post to go farming in the Mt. Currie district. During World War I he served as a Captain in the SAVC. He died on his farm Hlani (Mt. Currie) on 7/10/1947 at the age of 65 years. He is buried at St Johns Church, Swartberg.

 

Stranaghan, David ( - 22/12/1931)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 29/5/1890 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He did not return to England after the war, but practiced at Potchefstroom and later in Johannesburg. He died in Johannesburg on 22/12/1931.

 

Strong, C.D.

As a veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1898 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 5th Mounted Rifles. He took part in the action at the siege of Elands Rivers. Private practice Amanzimtoti (Garnell, Pullinger, ? , Max Taylor).

 

Strydom, Daniel Honey ( - July 1981)

He obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1965. In July 1981 he committed suicide in South West Africa.

 

Sturge, Herbert (1853 - 10/7/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14/12/1894 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He did not return to England after the war and appears to have served as a Government Veterinary Officer in the Transvaal from 1902 to 1905. He died on 10/7/1932 at the age of 79 at Potchefstroom where he had been in private practice. He is buried in the Church of England part of the cemetery in Potchefstroom in grave number 329 which has no gravestone over it.

 

Sugden, Albert Hugh (1863 - 10/7/1907)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in December 1889 and during the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 10/7/1907 aged 44 years at Southsea from Cirrhosis of the liver.

 

Sullivan, H.A. ( - 24/8/1940)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17/12/1891 and as a regular A.V.D. officer saw services with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 4/11/1899 to 14/11/1901. After service he returned to England. He died on 24/8/1940.

 

Swanston, Arthur Nelson Matcham ( - 27/1/1952)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21/5/1898 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 2/11/1901 to 17/11/1902. After the war he returned to England. He died on 27/1/1952 at Ledbury, Hereford.

 

Sykes, George ( - 14/3/1902)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in July 1900 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He died of Enteric Fever in Natal on 14/3/1902 and was buried at Charlestown. In 1964 his remains, together with the remains of all British soldiers buried at Charlestown, were disinterred and reburied in a common grave at Newcastle.

 

Symes, T.J. (1873 - 8/7/1929)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 13/12/1898 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. It is recorded that he sailed to South Africa aboard the SS Englishman on 26 April 1900. After the war he returned to England. He died on 8/7/1928 aged 56 years.

 

Symonds, S.L.

As a Veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1900 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 3rd New South Wales Mounted Rifles. He took part in the action at the siege of Elands River.

 

Symonds, S.L.

As a Veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1900 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 3rd New South Wales Mounted Rifles. He took part in the action at the siege of Elands River.