Adelaar, Thomas Frederick (26/3/1909 - 4/12/1980)

T.F. Adelaar obtained his metric in 1926 at the Hoogere Oost-Eind School in Pretoria and his BVSc degree at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, Onderstepoort in 1932. In 1933 he joined the Division of Veterinary Science as a State Veterinarian and saw service at Potgietersrus until 1938 and Armoedsvlakte until 1942 when he was transferred to the Virology Section at Onderstepoort. In 1947 he succeeded Dr D.G. Steyn as Senior Lecturer and Head of the Toxicology Section at Onderstepoort. He continued in this work and was solely responsible for the training of veterinary students in Toxicology for the next 26 years (1947 - 1973). He retired from the service on 31 March 1974 aged 65 years and died in Pretoria on 4 December 1980.

 

Aggio, Cusella ( - 26/3/1934)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 28 April 1886. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England where he practiced at Otley until 1907 when he moved to Malton, Yorks. He retired from practice in 1920. He died on 26 March 1934, age unknown.

 

Aitchison, David A.D. ( - 4/10/1965)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 July 1900 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon (C.V.S.) attached to the Army Veterinary Department (A.V.D.) during the Boer War. In 1903 he was serving as a District Veterinary Officer in the Orange Free State. He was subsequently Principal of the Government Veterinary College, Madras, India. He died in England on 4 October 1965.

 

Aitken, John James C.M.G. D.S.O. ( - 15/4/1946)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 7 July 1899 and saw service with the A.V.D. in South Africa from 13 April 1901 to 28 October 1902. After the war he returned to England. He spent a second tour of duty in South Africa from 1 January 1910 to 19 September 1914. During his first tour he commenced service as Civil Veterinary Surgeon before transferring to the A.V.D. He died on 15 April 1946.

 

Alexander, Raymond Albert (1899 - 1965)

Born in Benoni in 1899. He took a one-year Agric. Diploma course at the Potchefstroom College of Agriculture and then subsequently qualified BVSc (Agric) 1922 and BVSc (S.A.) at Onderstepoort in 1925. After qualifying, he joined the Division of Veterinary Services on 4 February 1926 and had an illustrious career. He obtained the DSc degree in 1935 for his work on the neurotropic virus of Horsesickness. He was appointed Director of Veterinary Services in 1950 and professor of infectious diseases at the Veterinary Faculty in 1958.

He was awarded an Honorary D.Sc by the University of Cape Town in 1955 and made an Honorary Professor of the University of Madrid and Honorary Member of the Medical Association of South Africa as well as an Honorary Member of the

Section of Comparative Medicine of the Royal Society of Medicine. He retired on pension in 1961 and became advisor to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. He died at Pretoria on the 8th of July 1965 at the age of 66 years. The list of his scientific publications is too long to record.

 

Allchurch, William Baron (11/12/1902 - 2/10/1979)

Born in Cape Town on 11 December 1902, he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1925. After qualifying as a Veterinarian he joined the Division of Veterinary Services on 4 February 1926 and served as Government Veterinary Officer at Umtata (4 February 1926), Butterworth (19 April 1926), Port St. Johns, Ixopo (14 September 1928), Allerton Laboratory, Mafeking (from September 1933), Vryburg (from January 1934), East London (from March 1939) and Port Elizabeth (from March 1942). In November 1944 he resigned from the service and went into practice with E.T. Clemow who had resigned as G.V.O. Port Elizabeth just prior to Allchurch's posting there. He remained in practice in Port Elizabeth until May 1973 when he retired. He died in Port Elizabeth on 2 October 1979. In 1934 he married Miss Elizabeth Adelaide Gibson and they had three children - Janet Elizabeth (born 5 October 1936) who married Dr Andre Brink, Bridget Adelaide (born 4 May 1938) and William Staten who married Miss Rosemary Glendinning.

During his service in Vryburg he was involved in a Dourine Eradication Campaign and in 1937 also dealt with a campaign to keep Foot and Mouth Disease from entering his area from the Bechuanaland Protectorate. When 130 head of cattle crossed the Molopo River into South Africa he had to supervise their destruction. He never got over the experience. During World War II, while he was stationed at East London, two French ships from the East were intercepted by the Royal Navy and escorted into East London harbour. On board these ships were hundreds of passengers with their pets and sufficient fowls, goats, cattle and sheep to feed them on their voyage to France. Due to the danger of these animals introducing disease into South Africa, Allchurch had to supervise their destruction and the disposal of their carcases. This he did by dumping them at sea in the Benguella Current. Much to his horror these carcases washed up on Haga Beach two days later and had to be finally disposed of by burial. When he commenced practice in Port Elizabeth in 1944 there was only one other veterinarian (Dunning) in the area besides his partner. Thirty years later there were ten practices in Port Elizabeth.

 

Allen, Henry O.B.E. (1877 - 23/7/1952)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 December 1899 and was a member of the Army Veterinary Service in South Africa after the Boer War from 16 May 1903 to 21 December 1903. In 1903 he joined the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association. He could however, not attend the inaugural meeting of this association held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16 February 1903, but the minutes of the meeting record that he sent his good wishes to the association. Nothing further is known of Allen except that he returned to England after his short tour of duty in South Africa and died on 23 July 1972 at Sidcup, Kent aged 75 years.

 

Amos, Sydney Thomas Arundell (3/3/1876 - 31/7/1948)

Born at Clevedon, Somerset on 3 March 1876, he qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 July 1898 and came to Natal as one of a party of 8 veterinarians (Cordy, Byrne, Harber, Woollatt, Hutchinson, Ashe) employed by the Natal Civil Veterinary Department to combat Rinderpest. He saw active service in the Boer War (Siege of Ladysmith and Battle of Elandslaagte) and the 1906 Zulu rebellion. In 1902 he married Miss Jane Alberta Martin of London. In 1909 he resigned from the Natal Civil Veterinary Department (C.V.D.). He took his FRCVS the same year, the subject to his thesis being "East Coast Fever". He then practiced in Durban until the outbreak of World War I when he saw service in the South West Africa Campaign. After the war he continued to practice in Durban. He was appointed veterinarian to the Durban Turf Club in 1911 and veterinarian to the Clairwood Turf Club in 1921. He served in both capacities until his death. He was President of the South African Veterinary Medical Association for a record of 9 consecutive years from 1936 to 1945. His wife died on 25 February 1937. He was a member of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association from 1908 and a founder member of the Natal Veterinary Medical Association from its inception on 19 November 1909. In 1947 he sold his practice to his son-in-law, L.R. Morford MRCVS and his daughter Vera, also a MRCVS. Two of his grandsons also became veterinarians viz. M.D. Morford (BVSc Pretoria 1970) and R.A. Morford (BVSc Pretoria 1972).

His signature (Sid T. Amos Vety Lieut) appears on a desk presently in the Talana Museum, which was presented by the officers of the Natal Volunteer Composite Regiment in August 1902 to Mrs Evans, wife of L-Colonel R.W. Evans N.M.R. who was killed in action near Vryheid on 20 February 1902.

 

Amos, Vera Jean Evelyn (16/2/1908 - 10/4/1988)

Born in Durban on 16 February 1908, she qualified MRCVS (London) in 1934. Thereafter she saw mixed practice for a short while in Yorkshire before returning to her father's (S.T.A. Amos) practice the same year in Durban.

In 1937 she married Leonard Rippon Morford (MRCVS) who predeceased her on 26 June 1964. Two of her sons M.D. and R.A. Morford also qualified as veterinarians. She died in Durban on 10 April 1988, aged 79 years. Throughout her married life she retained her maiden name of Amos.

 

Anderson, Robert Gray O.B.E. T.D. ( - 18/3/1956)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow on 18 December 1897). During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a C.V.S. attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He sailed to South Africa from Liverpool aboard the SS Helopies on 27 April 1900. In the Veterinary Record on 10 February 1906 he published an article entitled "The Civil Veterinary Surgeon on Active Service".

 

Anderson, Thomas A.J.O. B.E. ( - 27/1/1936)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 17 December 1885 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as C.V.S. in the A.V.D. He died on 27 January 1936.

 

Andrews, John Owen D.S.O. ( - 4/7/1972)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 16 December 1905 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 1 July 1907 to 9 March 1911. He was commissioned on 3 February 1906 and served at Pretoria, Mooi River, Potchefstroom and Cape Town. He was at Curragh when war was declared and accompanied the B.E.F. to France in August 1914. In 1920 he proceeded to India and was stationed at Jubbulpore. He was subsequently stationed at the Equitation School, Weedon for two years. In 1929 he again proceeded to India as Deputy Assistant D.V.S. Deccan district and later Assistant D.V.S. Northern Command. He returned to England in 1934, but went to India for a final tour of duty in 1936 as Deputy D.V.S. Northern Command. He retired from the Army on 18 January 1940 after 34 year's service. He died on 4 July 1972.

 

Andrews, William Horner (22/6/1887 - 17/3/1953)

Born on 22 June 1887 at Southsea, Hamps, he qualified BSc and MRCVS (London) on 17 July 1908. In 1910 he joined Sir Arnold Theiler's team of research workers at the Veterinary Research Institute, Onderstepoort until the outbreak of World War I. In 1914 - 1915 he undertook military service in the South West Africa Campaign. In 1918 he took charge of Allerton Laboratory and while there obtained his DSc degree on the study of Matricaria poisoning. In 1921 he was appointed Professor of Pathology at the new established Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort.

He left South Africa in May 1924 for the United Kingdom where he worked at McFadyean's Laboratory at the Royal Veterinary College, London.

In 1927 he was appointed Director of Weybridge. He served in this position until 1941 when he transferred to the U.K. Veterinary field staff. He retired in 1947 and returned to South Africa as a guest worker at Onderstepoort. He joined the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association in 1910. In 1923 he acted as intermediary between the veterinary faculty and the first 3 courses of students when they went on strike for higher salaries in the State Service. As a result of this strike the salary scale for the strikers only was raised from £240 - £450 p.a. to £450 - £800 p.a. for field staff and £500 - £850 p.a. for research staff. All previous and subsequent appointees were paid on the old scale. This lead to a situation where newly graduated veterinarians were in many instances receiving higher salaries than their lecturers. He died in South Africa on 17 March 1953.

 

Anthony, H.L. ( - 2/5/1917)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in 1901. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He was killed during World War I in an enemy air raid in France on 2 May 1917.

 

Anthony, W.S. C.M.G. ( - 15/11/1943)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 May 1895 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 31 March 1910 to 13 May 1910. In 1936 he was Col. Commandant of the R.A.V.C. He died on 15 November 1943.

 

Appleton, Arthur Frederick ( - 1942)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 26 April 1881 and as a regular officer of the A.V.D. he saw service in South Africa as Principal V.O. (A.V.D.) with the rank of Vety Lieut Colonel (Transvaal) in Pretoria from 1909 to 1913 in succession to Col. L.J. Blenkinsop. He was subsequently succeeded as P.V.O. (A.V.D.) Transvaal by C.F. Nuthall when he was transferred to Cape Town as P.V.O. (Cape).

While stationed in Pretoria he took an active interest in welfare matters and was responsible for the establishment of the Pretoria Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. He was also responsible for the compilation of a booklet entitled "The Management of Horses, Mules, Dogs, Cats and Poultry" which was issued to members of the public by this society.

He is recorded as being the last A.V.S. (previously A.V.D.) officer to leave South Africa. His last official act in South Africa took place in October 1914 when he handed over the office of S.V.O. of the A.V.S. to Captain J.W. Crowhurst of the S.A.V.C. This ended an era of British Army Veterinary presence in South Africa which commenced with Thomas Burrows in 1799 and ended with Appleton in 1914.

His son, F.E.H. Appleton, a Veterinary Technician at Onderstepoort and Allerton Laboratories, played an important role as Regimental Sergeant Major in the S.A.V.C. before World War II and can be seen on many of the S.A.V.C. photographs of that period.

 

Argyle, Edward Percy D.S.O. (1875 - 26/7/1935)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 16 July 1901 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa during the Boer War. After the war he returned to England. He died on 26 July 1935 at St Paul's Hospital, London. After service in South Africa he was commissioned in the R.A.V.C. During World War I he served in France for the first nine months of the war and was then posted to Egypt and served in the Gallipoli Campaign of 1915. He was awarded the D.S.O. and Croix de Guerre in 1917. After the war he served in India until he retired in 1930.

 

Arkcoll, William James ( - 4/2/1921)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 April 1872. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a C.V.S. attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 14 February 1921.

 

Armstrong, Harry Tennison (1968 - 1905)

The only record of this man is that he was a Veterinary Surgeon in the Cape Colony. It is recorded that he qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 May 1890. Thelma Gutsche in her book "There was a Man" mentions that Armstrong was loaned to G. Lagden, Resident Commissioner of Basutoland by Duncan Hutcheon in 1897/98. He died in

1905, aged 37 years. On 1 October 1896 he was appointed Assistant Veterinary Surgeon to the Cape of Good Hope Government and appears to have served in that capacity until his death.

 

Armstrong, R. ( - 13/2/1902)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) in 1895 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He died at Wynberg (Cape) on 13 February 1902 and is buried in the Watten Road Cemetary in a common grave with W. Kidd MRCVS and 28 others.

 

Arnold, Thomas Frederick ( - 6/7/1975)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 11 July 1917 and died on 6 July 1975. During his lifetime he was registered in South Africa, but nothing else is known about him.

 

Ascott, William O.B.E. T.D. J.P. (1864 - 25/6/1955)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 7 July 1885 and was a member of the Transvaal V.M.A. Nothing more is known about him. He died at Bideford, Devon on 25 June 1955, aged 91.

 

Ashe, James W.H. ( - 12/2/1900)

Born in Country Cork, Ireland he qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 1 July 1881. In October 1898 he was appointed to the Natal Civil Veterinary Department together with Amos, Byrne, Cordy, Harber, Woollatt and Hutchinson and was posted as District Veterinary Surgeon (D.V.S.) to Umzinto in succession to J.P. Byrne. He remained there until July 1899 when he was succeeded by W.M. Power. It is possible that he was then transferred to Pietermaritzburg, because at that time his address is recorded as being Rosedale, Pietermaritzburg. He subsequently served as a Trooper in the Border Mounted Rifles during the Siege of Ladysmith (October 1899 - March 1900) and H. Watkins-Pitchford in his book "Besieged at Ladysmith" records on Page 99 that the died in Ladysmith on Monday the 12th of February 1900 from Dysentry. He was buried in the Intombi camp (site of the hospital) cemetery outside the present township of Ladysmith. His grave can still be seen in this cemetery.

 

Ashworth, Ernest (1879 - 29/7/1911)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 24 May 1900. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 29 July 1911, aged 32.

 

Audas, Robert S. M.C. ( - 5/1/1966)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 July 1905 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 27 November 1907 to 5 October 1909. He subsequently became Assistant Director D.V.S. Sudan Veterinary Department. He died on 5 January 1966.

 

Aulton, William Thomas (1868 - 22/1/1911)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 16 November 1896 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a C.V.S. in the A.V.D. He died on 22 January 1911, aged 43 years.

 

Badenhorst, Jacobus Albertus

He qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1937. After qualifying he joined the Division of Veterinary Services and saw duty as G.V.O. at Umtata, Flagstaff, Keetmanshoop, De Aar and Standerton. After his resignation from the service in ± 1960 he proceeded to Bulawayo. He subsequently returned to South Africa and practiced at De Aar, in Swaziland and the Western Cape. After 1969 his name no longer appeared in the list of registered veterinarians and it is presumed that he had died.

 

Bales, Maud ( - 16/12/1947)

Born in Johannesburg she matriculated at the Parktown Girls' School. In December 1946 she obtained her BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort and after only a short while in practice she died suddenly on 16 December 1947. After her death her mother lodged a sum of £2 000 pounds in trust so that the interest accruing would be available as from 1950 for an annual bursary for veterinary students at Onderstepoort.

 

Balfour, George W.

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 26 May 1893. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. It is not known when he died.

 

Bambeta, E.

As a veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1901 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the New South Wales Imperial Bushmen and the First Commonwealth Horse Regiments.

 

Barker, Kenneth (1879 - 1/2/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 19 December 1901 and during the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 1 February 1932, aged 53 years from "Tubercular caries of the spine".

 

Barnard, Lawrence T.

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 19 December 1895 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa during the Boer war. During 1900 he was attached to the Rhodesian Field Force. After the war he returned to England. It is not known when he died.

 

Barnard, William George O.B.E. (14/9/1907 - 27/9/1980)

Born on 14 September 1907 at Lydenburg he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in June 1932. After qualifying as a veterinarian he joined the Division of Veterinary Services (24 June 1932) and for seven years was a Government Veterinary Officer in South Africa stationed mostly in East Griqualand.

In April 1939 he left South Africa and saw service as Principal Veterinary Officer in the High Commission Territory of Swaziland (in succession to W.A. Elder) until 1953 when he transferred to the Tanganyika Service. From August 1940 to May 1943 he served as Deputy Director of Veterinary Services in Tanganyika. In 1958 he returned to South Africa and practiced at Ballitoville on the Natal North Coast until his death on 27 July 1980 at the age of 73 years. In July 1939 he married Miss Marie Pringle. There were no children from this marriage. He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 1951 new years honours list for his service to the Swazi nation.

 

Barnes, Alfred William ( - 4/4/1942)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 22 January 1885 and during the Boer War saw service with the Second Queensland Mounted Infantry of the Australian forces. He died in England on 4 April 1942.

 

Barnes, Major William Gordon M.C. V.D. (16/2/1867 - 1/8/1939)

Born in the Highlands of Scotland on 16 February 1867, he obtained his MRCVS on 22 May 1888. His was a varied career. He served in the Indian Army, was a member of the Rough Riders during the Boer War and in World War I was again attached to the Indian Army. Prior to his arrival in South Africa he held the appointment of Superintendent of the City of London Abattoirs and Cattle Markets at Islington. For his services in London he was made a Freeman of the City in 1910. In 1913 he was appointed Director of the Municipal Abattoir and Transport Department of the Durban City Council, which post he held until 1932 when he was succeeded by W.A. Dykins. He died on 1 August 1939, 11 days after the death of his son, Harry Farquharson Barnes, on 21 July 1939. He was buried in the Stellawood Cemetary, Durban (Plot G852A) on the 2nd of August 1939 with full Military Honours. The tragedy of deaths in his family was continued by the death of his daughter, Jean on 24 September 1939 and his wife Isobella (born 2 March 1870) on 16 December 1940. All four members were buried in two adjoining graves (G852 and G852A). An elder son Capt. William James Gordon Barnes (born 17 December 1894) died on 27 February 1934. Major Barnes and his two sons were all recipients of the Military Cross.

 

Barningham, Darnley C. ( - 7/12/1900)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 21 December 1898 and served as Veterinary Surgeon with the 20th Batallion, Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War. He is buried in the old Pretoria Cemetary having died at Pretoria on 7 December 1900 of enteric fever. His gravestone is still in a good state of repair.

 

Barrass, George (1876 - 12/11/1911)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 29 May 1899. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a C.V.S. attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He died on 12 November 1911, aged 35 years of Phthisis.

 

Bartlett, Edgar Brown (1874 - 3/8/1960)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 23 July 1896 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Natal) from 8 April 1899 to 21 October 1902. During the Boer War he was besieged at Ladysmith. After service he returned to England. He died on 3 August 1960, aged 86 years.

 

Bate, Alfred (1868 - 7 March 1949)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 23 May 1888 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as C.V.S. in the A.V.D. He died at Penstone, Gobowen, Shropshire on 7 March 1949, aged 81 years.

 

Batt, Arthur Edward Goldstone (1871 - 22/8/1939)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 December 1892 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a C.V.S. in the A.V.D. He subsequently served as a veterinary officer in Nigeria and died on 22 August 1939, aged 68 years.

 

Bauling, Edward Christian ( - 12/12/1980)

He obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1962. After qualifying as a veterinarian he joined the Division of Veterinary Services and was stationed as State Veterinarian at Ermelo when he was killed in a motor accident on 12 December 1980.

 

Baxter, James W. ( - 11/1934)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 13 December 1894. The only facts known about this man are that on 21 October 1896 he was appointed to the Natal Civil Veterinary Department as one of the four veterinarians appointed on the recommendation of the Stock Commission. The others were Stapley, Verney and J.L. Webb. He died in November 1934. He served in Durban up to October 1898 when he resigned from this Department.

 

Beattie, R.S.

During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Beatty, Philip Vandeleur ( - 1956)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 July 1900 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 2 November 1901 to 3 November 1902. After the war he returned to England. He was awarded the Order of the Nile by the Sultan of Egypt. He probably died in 1956.

 

Beckett, Alfred James (1869 - 27/1/1959)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 20 December 1893. He is recorded as having served in the Natal Volunteer Veterinary Corps from 24 April 1906 to 12 November 1907. He died in Liverpool on 27 January 1959, aged 90 years.

 

Beech, John R.D. D.S.O. ( - 11/1915)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 27 April 1881 and served as a Colonel in the Army Veterinary Department, but in September 1888 gave up his Veterinary Commission for a Combatant Commission as Second Lieut in the 21st Hussars. He returned from retirement to take part in the Boer War where he commanded a regiment of Scottish Horse. He died in November 1915.

 

Beilby, Richard E. (1873 - 19/10/1939)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 21 May 1894. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He died on 19 October 1938, aged 66 years.

 

Bekker, Johan Godfried (31/7/1900 - 12/10/1960)

"Boet" Bekker was born at Aliwal North on 31 July 1900 and obtained his BSc (Agric) degree at the University of Stellenbosch in 1922 and his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1925. He saw service in the Department of Agriculture (from 4 February 1926) at Onderstepoort and Armoedsvlakte (from 3 August 1928). In 1933 he obtained his DVSc degree. Later he resigned from the service and joined Dr Kind in practice in Pretoria.

For many years he was the external examiner in medicine at the Veterinary Faculty at Onderstepoort. In 1930 he went overseas to study problems connected with wool research under Professor Barker of Leeds University and Dr Crew of Edinburgh. On his return to Onderstepoort he took charge of the wool research unit established there. He died on 12 October 1960.

 

Bell, John Henry (19/3/1866 - 24/6/1913)

Born Carlow, Ireland on 19 March 1866, he qualified MRCVS (London) in 1889. He came to South Africa in 1901 as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. During the period 20 June 1901 to 1 February 1905 he served as Veterinary Officer (Lieut) to the South African Constabulary. From 6 September 1904 he served with the Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department until 31 May 1908 when he resigned because of ill health. He returned to Ireland and died in Dublin on 24 June 1913. He attended the inaugural meeting of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16 February 1903.

 

Bell, James P. ( - 26/7/1921)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 14 January 1887. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He died on 26 July 1921.

 

Berger, John ( - 20/4/1982)

He obtained his MRCVS on 10 December 1938 in London. After qualifying he worked in a practice in Cheshire, but in 1952 he moved to Kenya where he practice in the Nanyuki and Nyeri districts. In 1962 he left practice and joined the Wellcome Research Laboratory in Kenya as a Veterinary Advisor. In 1975 he transferred to the Cooper's experimental farm Kwanyanga where he headed the Helminthology section. He officially retired in October 1981, but continued working at Kwanyanga until a few days before his death on 20 April 1982.

 

Bergh, Michiel

He obtained his BVSc degree with the first class to qualify at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1924. He thereafter joined the Division of Veterinary Services and served as State Veterinarian at Piet Retief, Middelburg (Transvaal) (from 3 November 1927) Louis Trichardt, De Aar, Bethlehem and Johannesburg. During his service at Piet Retief he prosecuted the Minister of Agriculture under the East Coast Fever Regulations for failing to dip some heifers.

 

Bergmann, Joachim Hans Karl Peter Fritz ( - 25/12/1982)

He qualified Dr Med Vet (Leipzig) in 1942. Details of his life are still being traced. During his stay in South Africa he was employed as State Veterinarian solely in South West Africa where he died on 25 December 1982.

 

Berne, James Coleman (1843 - 19/3/1907)

He obtained his MRCVS (London) in 1867. During his military career he spent two tours of duty in Natal. The first tour lasted from 28 November 1884 to 28 October 1885. During his second tour in Natal (1891 to 1895) he was promoted to the post of Senior Veterinary Officer (Vet'y Major) A.V.D. in succession to F.F. Crawford. This post he held from 1891 to 1895 when he in turn was succeeded as S.V.O. by R.T. Frost. As S.V.O./A.V.D. (Natal) he was stationed in Pietermaritzburg. He died on 19 March 1907 in London.

 

Best, Richard Hugh ( - 13/11/1983)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in 1976 and at the time of his death on 13 November 1983 was attached to the Cape Veterinary Hospital, Milnerton, Cape. It is recorded that his death occurred through drowning when he and Miss Jennifer Millard went sailing in a Hobie Cat Catamaran off the coast at Milnerton. Miss Millard's body was recovered from the beach south of Bok Point two days later. The Catamaran was found adrift off Bok Point. Best's body was not recovered.

 

Bevan, Llewellyn E.W. (1978 - 1957)

Born New Romney in 1978 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 July 1904. As a young man he had first studied medicine at Guys Hospital, but had to give up his studies on the death on the death of his father. When loaded 100 pounds by an uncle he became a veterinarian. In 1904 he was appointed Govt. Bacteriologist to Southern Rhodesia (S.R.) where he spent most of his life doing Trypanosomiasis research. In 1921 he was appointed Director of Veterinary Research in Southern Rhodesia. It is recorded that he produced a Horsesickness vaccine which was attenuated by passage through dogs. This vaccine was used in S.R. until 1932. He retired to Pinelands, Cape (22 Camp Road) where he died on 17 March 1957.

 

Bezuidenhout, Reinier Johannes (4/12/1936 - 12/6/1983)

Born on 4 December 1936 in the Germiston district he qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in November 1958 at the age of 21 years.

On 10 March 1959 he was appointed State Veterinarian, Estcourt in the post vacated by S.J. van Rensburg (His appointment salary scale was £ 750 x £ 50 - £ 900 x £ 60 - £1 560). However, he resigned shortly afterwards and left the service on 30 June 1959 to work for the S.P.C.A. On 1 August 1959 he rejoined the service and was once again posted to Estcourt. He remained there until he was transferred to Eshowe on 26 June 1961 (Salary on 1 December 1960 was R2 460). On 30 January 1962 he was transferred to Nongoma. On 14 November 1961 he was involved in the first of a series of road accidents when his car left the road between Eshowe and Empangeni and was seriously damaged. On 22 August 1962 he flew to South West Africa on special Foot and Mouth disease duties for three months. During this time he was also involved in an accident when he rose into the back of a stationary vehicle on a dusty road.

On 5 October 1963 he married Miss Dorothy Antoinette Christine Murphy in Durban. Two daughters and a son were born of this marriage. On 7 April 1964 he was again involved in an accident when his car collided with a horse. On 24 February 1966 he was involved in a further accident when he overturned his vehicle on the Nongoma to Mkuze road. He was subsequently transferred to Vryburg where he remained until his death on 12 June 1983 in Bloemfontein when he once again rode into the back of a stationary vehicle on a dusty road. He was buried in Vryburg.

 

Bickford, W.J. ( - ± 1920)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in April 1863 and saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the Second Mounted Rifles and the Fourth Imperial Bushmen (Australia).

 

Bigalke, Michael Hermann (15/3/1959 - 20/4/1987)

Born in Kimberley on 15 March 1959 he qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1982. After completing his two years National Service he joined Anglo American Co. as their veterinarian at Ogies in 1984. On the 1st July 1987 he was due to have taken up an appointment as senior lecturer in Animal Production Medicine at the Medical University of South Africa (MEDUNSA). He died as a result of an accidental gunshot wound on the 20th April 1987.

 

Bird, James Edmund (26/6/1947 - 16/3/1977)

Born in Johannesburg on 26 June 1947 he qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1970. Thereafter he went overseas for three months and on his return to South Africa he practiced on his father's farm in the Hekpoort Valley. He subsequently extended his practice to Krugersdorp. On 16 March 1977 he was killed in a motor accident near Zuurbekom on the Golden Highway while travelling to attend to a large animal case. He married a Veterinarian, Miss C.C. Dolman (BVSc 1970) who was a classmate of his at Onderstepoort.

 

Bishop, Gerhardus Petrus (12/7/1917 - 4/1/1974)

"Bolly" was born on 12 July 1917 at Marydale, Cape Province. He qualified at Onderstepoort in 1940 and after joining the Veterinary Division was posted to Malmesbury as State Veterinarian. Thereafter he served at Allerton Laboratory and Dundee. In 1949 he joined the lecturing staff of the Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Natal and Pietermaritzburg where he spent the next 15 years. In 1965 he returned to Onderstepoort where he served until forced to retire due to ill health at the age of 55. On retirement he went to live in Pietermaritzburg where he suffered a severe stroke at the end of 1973. He died at the Hillcrest Hospital on 4 January 1974.

 

Bisschop, John Henri Roosegaarde (20/12/1898 - 27/4/1984)

Born in Pretoria on the 20th December 1898 he attended the Oost-Eind School where he matriculated. He subsequently obtained an Agric. Diploma (Cum Laude) at Elsenburg and a BSc (Agric) degree at the Transvaal University College. In 1924 he qualified as a Veterinarian with the first group of eight students at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort. After qualifying he served for a while in the Department of Gynaecology/Surgery at Onderstepoort. In 1927 he took charge of the experimental station at Armoedsvlakte and although he returned to Onderstepoort on 11 August 1928 he remained in charge of this station until 1958. At Onderstepoort he became lecturer in zootechnics which position he held from 1930 until his retirement in 1962. In 1936 he was appointed as Professor of Zootechnics. He led a very active life and was involved in many advisory activities viz.:

1943 Seconded to Swaziland
1945 Seconded to Kenya
1946 Seconded to Bechuanaland
1949 Seconded to Uganda
1951 Seconded to Sudan
1952 Seconded to Basutoland
1953 Seconded to Nyasaland
1950 - 1955 he served on the "Tomlinson Commission". Prior to World War II he played an active role in the South African Veterinary Corps. He lived his retirement years in the Mt. Currie district where he died in his sleep on the night of 27th of April 1984, aged 85 years. His eldest son, P.J.N.R. Bisschop, qualified as a Veterinarian at Onderstepoort in 1954, but was tragically killed in a motor accident outside Durban on 14 July 1973. His younger son, G.H.R. Bisschop (BVSc 1959) practices at Kokstad.

 

Bisschop, Phillipus Johannes Neethling Roosegaarde (26/5/1932 - 14/7/1973)

Born in Pretoria on 26 May 1932, the son of Professor J.H.R. Bisschop of the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort, obtained his BVSc degree at Onderstepoort in December 1954. After qualifying as a Veterinarian, he proceeded to England where he practiced for a while and thence to Canada where he practiced in Edmonton, Alberta for 18 months. On his return to South Africa he practiced at various places before setting up his own practice in Northdene, Durban. He was killed in a motor accident while on duty on 14 July 1973. Besides having a father who was a Veterinarian, his brother G.H.R. Bisschop also qualified as a Veterinarian at Onderstepoort in 1959.

 

Blenkinsop, Sir Layton J. K.C.B., D.S.O. ( - 28/4/1942)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 28 March 1883 when he joined the A.V.D. Shortly afterwards he was appointed D.V.S. of the A.V.D. in India. From 1890 to 1893 he was Veterinary Advisor to the Punjab Government and the Province of Lahore Veterinary College. In 1898 he took part in the Nile expedition and the Battle of Khartoum. He arrived in South Africa on 1 November 1899 and stayed until 1 January 1903.

His second tour of duty in South Africa lasted from 4 August 1906 to 28 December 1909 when he served as P.V.O. (Vet'y Lieut Colonel) in charge of the A.V.D. in South Africa with headquarters at the Artillery Barracks in Pretoria in succession to J.A. Nunn.

On 12 January 1909 he attended the Pan African Congress held in Pretoria to correspond with the official opening of the Research Institute at Onderstepoort. When he transferred from South Africa he was succeeded as P.V.O. (A.V.D.) by Col. A.F. Appleton. He subsequently served as Director-General of the A.V.D. from 1917 to 1921 when on his retirement he was awarded the K.C.B. On 22 June 1923 he unveiled the Role of Honour at the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. He died on 28 January 1942, aged 79 years.

 

Blomefield, Loftus Charles (26/5/1905 - 25/7/1974)

Born in Durban on 26 May 1905 he qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1928. After qualifying he joined the Division of Veterinary Services on 14 January 1929 as a G.V.O. and did duty at Umtata (to 8 June 1931), Port St. Johns, Flagstaff, Greytown (up to October 1944) and East London. At East London he spent a number of years full time of tick research and carried out extensive dipping trials. He was subsequently invited by the Rhodesian Government to advise them on dipping matters.

In 1955 he was promoted to the post of Assistant Director of the Cape East and Transkei region in succession to C.H. Flight on his transfer to Cape Town. In 1960 he was transferred to Pietermaritzburg to take over control of the Natal region from the retired L.L. Daly. He finally retired in 1965, but continued to carry out meat inspection at the whaling station in Durban. He died in Pietermaritzburg on 25 July 1974.

 

Boardman, Neville Hayes (9/11/1910 - 5/5/1972)

Born in Pretoria on 9 November 1910, he qualified BVSc (S.A.) at Onderstepoort in 1935. From 1936 until 1939 he worked for the South African Directorate of Veterinary Services and then resigned to join the Bechuanaland Protectorate Veterinary Department. Except for a brief period of service in Swaziland in 1954, Boardman served the Bechuanaland Protectorate Government continuously from 1939 until 1965. During his service in Bechuanaland he was stationed at Palapye, Lobatse, Mafeking and Ramathlabama. He was promoted to Senior Veterinary Officer in 1950 and to Director of Veterinary Services, Swaziland in 1954. Poor health however forced him to return to Bechuanaland a few months later on demotion to Veterinary Officer.

Thereafter he actively withdrew from field duties and concentrated on training lay African inspectors at the Veterinary Training School at Ramathlabama - a task at which he excelled.

On his retirement on internal self-government of Bechuanaland in 1965, he was Principal of the Veterinary Training School at Ramathlabama. After retirement he rejoined the South African Veterinary Service and was stationed at the old Johannesburg Municipal Abattoir. He died in Johannesburg in 5 May 1972.

 

Boase, John Tregortha (1867 - 27/12/1948)

As an MRCVS (Edinburgh) 22 December 1890, he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War for an unknown period of time as a Veterinary Officer. At the time of being seconded into the Army he was in private practice in Cape Town. He died on 27 December 1948, aged 81 years.

 

Bodilly, Walter (1860 - 21/4/1892)

As an Assistant Lieutenant (Veterinary Surgeon) to the Pioneer Column to Rhodesia, it is recorded that he died and was buried at Macloutsi (Fort Matlaputla) on 21 April 1892. In 1961 an expedition to the cemetery at Fort Matlaputla, lead by Col. A.S. Hickman (BSAP) recorded that of the 37 graves there, only 16 are of known persons, while only 5 are marked. Assistant Lieutenant Bodilly's grave is not on Hickman's list of the 16 known persons.

 

Bogue, James Yule

All that is known of this man is that he qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 11 December 1908 and that he registered as a Veterinary Surgeon under Act No. 16 of 1933 at its implementation. At the time he was living at 389 Windermere Road, Durban. The RCVS records that his name was voluntarily removed from its register.

 

Bone, H. M.C. ( - 5/12/1948)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21 December 1906 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 1 February 1908 to 7 February 1913. He died on 5 December 1948 at Gullane, East Lothian.

 

Borthwick, John Downie (31/10/1867 - 18/6/1936)

Born in Kirkliston, he was the son and brother of Veterinary Surgeons and qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 23 May 1888. He came to South Africa on 27 March 1889 as the first assistant to Duncan Hutcheon, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon to the Cape of Good Hope. In 1891 on the appointment of Alexander Edington as Colonial Bacteriologist in Grahamstown, Borthwick was seconded to assist him in his study of animal diseases. This he did from 1891 until 1893. Later he served as Assistant Veterinary Surgeon in various parts of the Cape Colony. He was subsequently (19 July 1906) promoted to the post of Chief Veterinary Surgeon vacated by Hutcheon when the latter was promoted to the post of Director of Agriculture on 17 July 1906. He then had 16 Assistant Veterinary Surgeons under his control in the Cape.

On 12 January 1909 he attended the Pan African Congress held in Pretoria to correspond with the official opening of the Research Institute at Onderstepoort. After Union was declared he became Assistant Principal Veterinary Officer, Pretoria with seniority from 1 January 1912. On Gray's retirement as Principal Veterinary Officer of the Union of South Africa on 10 May 1921 he took over as P.V.O. until he retired on pension on 31 March 1927.

At the time of his retirement he had served 38 years which at that time was the longest service record in the Department. He then entered the service of the Imperial Cold Storage Co. as Veterinary Advisor. In this capacity the I.C.S. Ranch at Nuanetsi regularly and interested himself in the transport of stock by rail. He died at his Arcadia North home in Pretoria on 18 June 1936.

1. In 1895 he undertook an experiment at Witklei Rugge (Alexandria) which demonstrated that bone-meal feeding is a sound preventative against Lamsiekte.

2. Being very interested in animal husbandry he was twice sent overseas to purchase improved stock. In 1903 he went to Spain and selected 23 Catalonian Jacks for the breeding of improved mules. In 1911 he purchased Hereford cattle and horses in England. These animals subsequently took all the prices at the shows in the Cape.

During his lifetime he related a story of his student days in Edinburgh which went as follows:

He and a friend were both boxing enthusiasts and considered themselves very good fighters. So good in fact did they think they were, that they challenged the local blacksmith to a bout of fisticuffs. Although they had considered the challenge to be one of single combat, the blacksmith took them both on together and in a very short while rendered them unconscious.

 

Bostock, Arthur ( - 1/9/1924)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21 December 1874 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 1 June 1900 to 17 November 1902. After service he returned to England. He died at Bedford Park, London on 1 September 1924.

 

Botes, Hendrik Jacobus Weideman

He qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1951. Thereafter he went into private practice for a while until transferring to Onderstepoort where he developed a live attenuated Salmonella vaccine for use in calves and poultry. He was subsequently employed by Agricura Ltd. until his death. His widow remarried and is not prepared to give the author details on his life.

 

Botha, Hermanus Nicolaas (2/7/1923 - 26/6/1976)

Born on 2 July 1923 in Vrede, Orange Free State, he qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1945, when he was awarded his BVSc with honours as well as being awarded the Theiler and Clinical Medals. After qualifying he practiced at Springs and Benoni until 1956 when he went farming at Kalwerfontein in the Vrede district. He died there on 26 June 1976.

 

Bowhay, Alfred B. O.B.E. ( - 15/4/1952)

All that is known of this man is that he qualified MRCVS (London) on 19 July 1907 and practiced at 48 Osborn Road, Orange Grove, Johannesburg. In 1936 he was re-employed at Exeter by the RAVC from the temporary reserve of officers. In 1940 he was Veterinarian to the SPCA in Johannesburg. He died on 15 April 1952.

 

Bowhill, Thomas M.B.E. (1857 - 1/9/1925)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 28 April 1886 and appears to have come to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. On 28 July 1902 he was appointed Assistant Veterinary Surgeon to the Cape of Good Hope Government. He subsequently took over (1 November 1905) from Dr Alexander Edington as Government Bacteriologist, Grahamstown when the latter resigned on 30 June 1905. He is recorded to have written a standard work "Essential Bacteriology and Technique". He was one of those who expounded the theory that Botulism is caused by Pasteurella bovis. In 1921 he was employed as a Veterinary Officer in Kampala, Uganda. It is not known when he died in Durban, but he was buried on 28 August 1925 in Block H No. 84 of the Stellawood Cemetery. There is no gravestone on his grave. He was 68 years old when he died.

 

Brand, James (1867 - 25/7/1943)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 22 December 1890. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa as a temporary Civil Practitioner. For one month (13 May 1902 to 13 June 1902) he served as V.O. to the S.A. Constabulary. He died on 25 July 1943, aged 76 years.

 

Brand, F.R. ( - 2/3/1929)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in 1896 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a C.V.S. in the A.V.D. In 1897 he also served in the Cape Civil Veterinary Division. In 1921 was employed as Chief Veterinary Officer of the Province of Zaire in Northern Nigeria. He died on 2 March 1929.

 

Brandford, Professor William Catton

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 May 1857 and in 1869 succeeded Thomas Strangeways as Professor of Anatomy at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College. On 6 September 1876 he arrived at the Cape to take up appointment as the first Colonial Veterinary Surgeon to the Government of the Cape Colony on a 3-year contract. Until D. Hutcheon's appointment on 2 March 1880 he was the only Veterinary Surgeon in the Colony.

He returned to England after serving his contract and in 1880 he was struck off the RCVS register for reasons of fraud and subsequent imprisonment. Overlooking his crime, it must be remembered that his was a single-handed mammoth task to visit and report on the Colony's livestock and to advise "the Government of its general health". He had to investigate mortality, ascertain its causes, take steps to remedy the problem and make suggestions to prevent it's recurrence - all this during very turbulent political time. Some of the conditions he encountered were known to him, other not, e.g. Lungsickness, Tuberculosis, Glanders, Sheep Scab, Mange, etc. Other diseases which he encountered had already been named by the farmers, but very little was known about them e.g. Galsiekte, Lamsiekte, Vermeersiekte, Slak, Dikkop, "Meltziekte" and Hartwater.

 

He was extremely overworked even by modern standards e.g. within 12 months of assuming duties he covered 3 000 - 4 000 miles. He travelled by rail, post cart and sometimes by steamer from Cape Town to Port Elizabeth. Hints on the treatment of Vermeersiekte handed to him by farmers consisted of remedies such as gunpowder, vinegar, tarwater, oil and epsom salts.

Recommendations which he made to his Government were:

1. Destruction and burial of all Glanders cases

2. A closed season for bird shooting be introduced

3. The prohibition of veld burning

In 1890 he successfully appealed to have his name restored to the RCVS register. Regrettably, no record can be found of this pioneer's birth or final resting place.

 

Brandsen, Johannes Gerhardus (1892 - 1955)

He was born in 1892 and qualified as a Veterinarian at Utrecht in 1918. He came to South Africa for a while, but then emigrated to Australia. He later returned to South Africa and worked for a Stock Feed Company until 1939. He served as Veterinarian to the Bloemfontein Turf Club from 19 June 1922 to 1923. During World War II he served as a sergeant in the Medical Corps. After the war he set up practice in Ficksburg, Orange Free State where he died in 1955.

 

Bray, Charles Trevina ( - 2/1/1943)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 26 March 1886 and saw service during the Boer War as a Veterinary Officer with the South African Light Horse Regiment. He died on 2 January 1943.

 

Breytenbach, Conrad Marniwick ( - 24/11/1980)

He qualified BVSc at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1956. He subsequently worked for the State in Natal and the Transvaal, but it has not been possible for the author to obtain details of his life.

 

Bright, Wilfred F.L. ( - 22/11/1921)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 20 December 1907 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 17 December 1910 to 18 March 1913. He died on 22 November 1921 in India.

 

Britton, Thomas A.

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 22 March 1886. A Rabies outbreak in Port Elizabeth in 1893 in an imported Airdale dog was diagnosed by Britton. This diagnosis was confirmed by Duncan Hutcheon. Together with A. Theiler, E.A. Hollingham and James Richardson he was appointed Honorary Veterinary Surgeon to the 1st Johannesburg Agricultural Show held in March 1895.

 

Brogan, Edward Henry ( - 7/4/1932)

All that is known of this man is that he qualified MRCVS (London) on 6 January 1908 and served as a Captain in the SAVC during World War I. He died on 7 April 1932 at Vryburg.

He is also recorded as having been a Government Veterinary Officer at Choma, Northern Rhodesia (Zambia). The church register in Vryburg records that he was 38 years old at the time of his death (This information is obviously incorrect as he could not have been 14 years old when he qualified MRCVS, so it is more likely that he was 44 years old at the time of his death). This register also records that his cause of death was "throat cut". The "Northern News", Vryburg of 8 April 1932 records hat he was discovered with a cutthroat in the toilet of a train passing through Vryburg to the south and when found he was still alive but died shortly afterwards. His body was removed from the train for burial purposes. Foul play was not suspected, so he had obviously committed suicide. It appears that he was on his way to Cape Town to take passage to England on the Edinburgh Castle.

 

Brookes, William Turley (6/1878 - 5/8/1961)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 July 1905 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 10 September 1906 to 21 February 1908. He died on 5 August 1961, aged 83 years.

 

Brown

He was in service with the A.V.D. in South Africa (Natal) from 1884. After service he returned to England. He also took part in the Bechuanaland Campaign of 1884/85 (Warren Expedition) together with Duck, Cox, Rangelly, Gentle and Rutherford. His christian names were unfortunately not recorded. He may have been one of the two Alexander Brown's who obtained their MRCVS (Glasgow) on 24 April 1883.

 

Brown, Edward D.S.O ( - 17/2/1969)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 13 July 1898 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 3 November 1899 to 13 August 1902. After service he returned to England. He died on 17 February 1969.

 

Brown, Paul Hornidge (1/11/1916 - 8/8/1978)

Born at Trail in the province of British Columbia, Canada on 1 November 1916 he immigrated to South Africa with his parents in 1924. He attended St John's College, Johannesburg and subsequently qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1939. On the 28th of December of that year, he joined the Veterinary Division of the Department of Agriculture as State Veterinarian and was stationed at the following places:

1939 - 1940 Port Shepstone

1941 - 1942 Umtata

1943 (6 months) Bedford

1943 - 1945 Flagstaff

1946 - 1948 Aliwal North

1948 - 1951 Port Elizabeth

In March 1951 he transferred to the Colonial Service as Principal Veterinary Officer to the Basutoland Government. He was stationed at Maseru. Part of his duties was to improve livestock in that country. For his services in improving the Basuto pony he was presented with an Arab stallion "Silver Eagle" by the Basutoland Government. On the 16th of October 1963 he left Lesotho and practiced part time with Dr Sidney Turner at Port Shepstone until 1967. He died on the 8th of August 1978. On 6 March 1943 he married Miss Lindrea Swift Shone of Bedford, Cape. This marriage produced two daughters, viz. Pauline and Verrall. In 1936 and 1938 he played first team cricket and hockey for the University of Pretoria.

 

Brown, Major Henry Victor (2/5/1912 - 7/3/1955)

He was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia on 2 May 1912 and qualified BVSc at Onderstepoort in December 1931 (aged 19 years). He was appointed as Research Officer, Onderstepoort in 1931, but resigned in February 1936 to take up an appointment as Pathologist and Bacteriologist at Insein Veterinary Laboratory, Burma. After the completion of his term of contract he returned to South Africa. He then joined Dr J. Boswell in practice in Johannesburg where he worked until his death on 7 March 1955.

 

Brownless, J.W. ( - 26/5/1915)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 21 May 1897. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department.

It is recorded that he, together with E.T.C. Ensor and H. Gamble were attached to the Royal Scots Greys as Veterinary Officers. After the war he returned to England. In 1897 he was awarded the 2nd Fitzwygram Prize, the 1st prize having been won by A.F. Harber and the 3rd prize by J.F. Thurston, all of whom came to South Africa. He died of wounds on 26 June 1915 following an active service in the Dardenelles during World War I.

 

Brownrigg, Percy (24/4/1868 - 1901)

Born at West End, Durham on 24 April 1968, he qualified MRCVS (London) on 29 May 1894. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a C.V.S. attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He presumably died in 1907.

 

Brümmer, Barend Jacobus (5/4/1889 - 13/9/1981)

Born on the farm Douglas in the Barkley East district on 5 April 1889 he qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Utrecht on the 27th of July 1915. In doing so he was probably the first South African to qualify as a Veterinarian in Holland.

After qualifying he practiced in the South Eastern Corner of Holland where he married the sister of the Veterinarian for whom he worked. He subsequently returned to South Africa and on 3 January 1916 joined the Division of Veterinary Services. During his official service he was stationed at Durban (1916 - 1920), Vryheid (1929 to 28 June 1932), Kroonstad (1932 to 1948) and Eshowe. From 1920 to 1922 he was stationed at Pretoria, 1922 to 1925 Elliot, 1925 to 1929 Burgersdorp.

He retired from the service in 1948 and continued to practice in Kroonstad and Senekal until ± 1965. He died on 13 September 1981, aged 92 yeas. He was one of the leading characters in the well-known book "Dutch Vet" in which his brother-in-law was the main character "Dr Vlimmen".

 

Buck, Joseph (29/2/1872 - 1/9/1941)

Born Ragdale Hall, Leicestershire in 1872, he qualified MRCVS at the new Edinburgh College on 21 May 1895. During the Boer War he came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department and served at Kimberley. It is recorded that he sailed for South Africa aboard the SS Montford on the 26th of April 1900. After the war he settled at Kimberley in private practice. Subsequently he served the De Beers Corporation, Kimberley Municipality and the Southern Rhodesian Government.

In 1923 he joined the South African Government Veterinary Service and retired on pension on reaching the maximum age on 29 February 1932. After his retirement he returned to private practice until he died on 1 September 1941.

 

Buhr, Wilhelm Heinrich Bernhard (6/11/1922 - 25/8/1978)

Born at Port Shepstone on 6 November 1922 he qualified BVSc at Onderstepoort in December 1945. On 4 June 1946 he joined the Veterinary Field Division of the Department of Agriculture and was stationed at the following places as Government Veterinary Officer viz. Umtata, Kokstad, Mafeking and from 1 January 1966 to 31 August 1968 Windhoek, South West Africa (Salary R4 500 - R5 100). On 1 September 1968 he was promoted to the post of Assistant Director of Veterinary Services, Windhoek (Salary R5 400), but on 20 September 1972 was transferred as Assistant Director to take charge of the Natal Region. This post be held until his death following a long illness on 25 August 1978. During the last years of his life he suffered greatly from ill health and was subjected to a series of operations, firstly for kidney stones (22 June 1976 - 6 August 1976) and later underwent a radical mastectomy (2 December 1977 - 9 September 1978), because he had developed cancer of the left breast. He finally died from cancer of the lungs. He is buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Bishopstowe outside Pietermaritzburg.

 

Burns, J.L.

As a veterinary graduate of Melbourne Veterinary College in 1890 he saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 3rd Bushmen Contingent.

 

Burridge, T.E.

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 July 1904 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 12 October 1905 to 3 January 1911. In 1910 he was the A.V.D. Officer stationed in the Cape Peninsula. His name was removed from the RCSV register at his own request on 15 August 1955. It is not known when he died.

 

Burrows, Thomas

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 30 March 1799. Immediately after qualifying he entered the British army and the same year joined his regiment (the 8th Light Dragoons) at the Cape of Good Hope where he was on garrison duty. When the 8th Dragoons subsequently proceeded to India, Burrows took part and distinguished himself in the battle of Laswari in the second Mahratta War of 1805. Thomas Burrows was the first veterinarian to set foot on South African soil - if only for a very brief period. The last British army veterinarians left South Africa at the end of October 1914.

 

Burt, Walter (1839 - 22/9/1905)

Born in 1839 he qualified MRCVS (London) in 1860 and from 1879 to 1880 saw service with his regiment in Natal in the Zulu War of 1879. He arrived in Natal aboard the "Ontario" with 420 mules transported from New York. It is to his credit that only 11 of them died on the voyage from America. He also served in the Aegyptian Campaign of 1882. He died at Eastbourne on 22 September 1905.

 

Bush, Col. Joseph George D.S.O. (11/4/1877 - 1/3/1948)

Born in Lazenby, Yorkshire on 11 April 1877 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 17 December 1902 and saw service in South Africa in the latter part of the Boer War with the Imperial Yeomanry. After the cessation of hostilities he went back to England, but returned to South Africa and joined the Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department on 16 March 1903. After serving as District Veterinarian, Krugersdorp (± 1910) and practicing in Kimberley (1912-1913) he was appointed Deputy Director of the South African Veterinary Corps in September 1914. He subsequently succeeded Col. Irvine-Smith as Director of the Corps (1 March 1916 to 28 March 1919 and 1 July 1921 to 1 May 1931). For his contribution to the war effort during World War I he was awarded the D.S.O. and 1914-1915 Star. On 1 May 1931 he retired from the army. During the period 29 March 1919 to 30 June 1921, J.B. Collyer was Director of the SAVC.

Col. Bush is included on a photograph of a group of District Veterinary Surgeons who visited Onderstepoort in 1910 and Curson records that at that time he was District Veterinary Surgeon, Krugersdorp and that his initials were W.G. This latter fact is in doubt. He died on 1 March 1948.

 

Butcher, George Hastings ( - 14/6/1947)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 16 December 1896. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 14 June 1947.

 

Butler, Major Gen. Ernest Rubin Charles C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O.(3/7/1864 - 16/6/1959)

Born Ballincollic, County Cork, Eire on 3 July 1864, he qualified MRCVS (London) on 5 July 1884 and obtained his FRCVS on 7 December 1893.

Most of his life was spent as a regular officer in the A.V.C. He played a major role in reforming the Veterinary Organisation of the British Army when in 1906 the Army Veterinary Department (A.V.D.) (comprising officers) and the Army Veterinary Corps (A.V.C.) (comprising NCOs and other ranks) were amalgamated under the Army Veterinary Corps. The reforms which he played a major role in introducing was the creations of veterinary hospitals, the training of personnel, the accumulation and mobilisation of reserve stores and the compilation of records and instructions e.g. Standing Orders (1906), Animal Management (1907) and Veterinary War Manual (1914). He saw service during the Burma War and in World War I with Gen. Allenby in Egypt. Besides the D.S.O. he was also awarded a Serbian Military decoration and the order of the Nile by the Sultan of Egypt.

In 1923 he settled in Kokstad and farmed there very successfully until his death on 16 June 1959. The Journal of the RAVC (Vol. 1 No. 4 August 1939) reports the death of his wife at Kokstad on 5 July 1939. They were married in Madras in 1891.

 

Byrne, John Peter (1870 - 4/7/1902)

Born in Cork, Ireland, he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 19 December 1894. In September 1898 (together with Cordy, Harber, Woollatt, Hutchinson, Ashe and Amos) he entered the Natal Civil Veterinary Department and also saw service in the Natal Volunteer Corps during the Boer War. He served throughout the Siege of Ladysmith (October 1899 - March 1900) together with Veterinary Surgeons H. Watkins-Pitchford, W.M. Power and J.W.H. Ashe. He served as District Veterinary Surgeon, Umzinto until October 1898 when he was transferred to Pietermaritzburg in succession to S.B. Woollatt. He was succeeded at Umzinto by J.W.H. Ashe. He died at Richmond, Natal on 4 July 1902, aged 32 years and is buried in Plot 20 of the Richmond (Natal) Cemetery. A wrought iron railing around his grave carries the inscription "This railing was erected by his colleagues of the Government (Natal) Veterinary Department".