Gamble, Henry O.B.E O. du O.M.A. ( - 3/2/1952)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 12 December 1898 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 13 April 1901 to 21 September 1902, when, together with J.W. Brownless and E.T.C. Ensor he served as Veterinary Surgeon to the Royal Scots Greys. After the war he returned to England. He completed a second tour of duty in South Africa from 14 December 1910 to 2 May 1913. He died on 3 February 1952.

 

Garden, George ( - 20/12/1957)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 28 may 1900. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he served in the Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department and was stationed at Hlatikulu, Swaziland during the period 1904/1905. He died on 20 December 1957 at Sutton Coldfield, Warwicks.

 

Gardiner, Benjamin, Channing Rouse (1824 - 30/9/1899)

Born in 1824 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in April 1843 and from then to 1848 saw service with the British Army (7th Dragoon Guards) at the Cape of Good Hope. He took part in the Frontier (Kaffir) War of 1846/47. He finally retired from the Army on 21 July 1879 and died on 30 September 1899 at Ilfracombe, aged 75 years.

 

Garland, Joseph

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 18 December 1898. The only record of him is that he was a Veterinary Surgeon in the Cape Colony after 1896 (A.M. Diesel).

 

Garnett, George ( - 6/4/1920)

Very little is known about this man other than that he qualified MRCVS (London) on 1 July 1875 and possibly took part in the 5th Basuto War of 1880 - 1881 as one of three Veterinary Officers to the Cape Mounted Rifleman (CMR) from 7 May 1880 to 31 March 1882 (the others were T.H. Merrick and T.B.S. Dawkins). He died on 6 April 1920 at Hove.

 

Garraway, Roger Sutton (10/9/1876 - 29/9/1964)

Born in Waterford, Ireland on 10 September 1876, he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 29 May 1899 he came to South Africa during the Boer War, not as a Veterinary Surgeon, but as a Farrier Sergeant. In South Africa he served with the 13th Battalion of the Imperial Yeomanry and it is recorded that together with E.A.L. Fenner the Veterinary Officer of his regiment, he was captured at Lindley (Orange Free State). When Fenner subsequently died of dysentery and pneumonia while a prisoner of war he was buried by Garraway at Vrede (Orange Free State) on 23 June 1900. From 14 July 1901 to 30 April 1903 he served as Veterinary Officer to the S.A. Constabulary. On 1 May 1903 he was appointed as a Government Veterinary Officer in the Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department. Most of his early service in this Department was in Pretoria where he played a particularly active part in the control of an outbreak of East Coast Fever which occurred in 1919. This outbreak was finally brought under control in 1922. In 1914 he married Miss Olive Sharp of Bloemfontein. In 1924 he was promoted to the post of Senior Veterinary Officer, South West Africa in succession to Major Alex Goodall. From South West Africa he was transferred to Bloemfontein as Senior Veterinary Officer (5 October 1927) and while there, retired from the service in September 1931. In 1928 he acted as Veterinarian to the Bloemfontein Turf Club. He was succeeded by J.J.G. Keppel. After his retirement he set up practice in Pretoria where he practice until 1961.

He died at 332 Prinsloo Street, Pretoria on 29 September 1964 at the age of 88 years.

 

Gaulton, Ian ( - 1977)

An Australian by birth he attained his BVSc degree from the University of Queensland in 1976. Shortly afterwards he came to South Africa and worked on contract as an Assistant to Drs Baker and Du Preez in Gilletts. When his contract was completed, the practice gave him an overseas trip rather than the usual cash bonus. It was while he was on this overseas trip at the end of 1977 that he disappeared while scuba diving off the Bahamas. It appears that a party of four were diving with an instructor. When the divers got into difficulties the instructor managed to rescue two of them. One scuba pupil was found drowned whereas Gaulton's body was never recovered.

 

Gavin, Major Frederick Charles D.S.O. (February 1868 - 17/10/1950)

Born at Ayr in February 1868, Major Gavin graduated MRCVS (London) in 1889 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a C.V.S. in the A.V.D., being attached to the 8th Hussars. In December 1902 he was appointed Manager of the Sanitary Department of the Johannesburg Municipality and in this capacity he served until 31 December 1908. On 1 January 1909 he also took over the supervision of animal transport in the Municipality and on 1 July 1911 he also assumed duty as Municipal Veterinary Surgeon. During World War I he saw active service in Belgium and France as a Major in the SAVC and was awarded the D.S.O. On the death of E. Wilson on 6 June 1932 he succeeded him as Veterinarian to the Johannesburg Turf Club. It is also recorded that he took over Johnston's Veterinary Vaccine Agency in 1929. He retired to Swaziland, but finally settled in Kloof, Natal where he died on 17 October 1950. During his lifetime he was a member of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association and attended its inaugural meeting held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16 February 1903.

 

Gentle, Alexander Henderson (25/4/1851 - 11/5/1936)

Born on 25 April 1851 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 15 April 1880. He appears to have joined the Cape Mounted Riflemen (CRM) as a trooper and to have arrived in South Africa on 27 April 1881. He disembarked at East London and was stationed at King Williamstown where on 6 October 1881 he was gazetted as Veterinary Surgeon to the CMR in place of George Garnett (Retired). In 1884 he is recorded as having served with F. Duck in Natal, being stationed at Pietermaritzburg. The same year he accompanied F. Duck, Cox, Rangeley, Brown and Rutherford as a Veterinary Officer with the Warren Expedition but would appear to have remained behind at Taungs.

He left South Africa in 1885 and practiced at Otley, but shortly before his death he settled at Spondon where he died on 11 May 1936, aged 85 years.

 

Gibbs, Hugh Edward D.S.O. (1879 - 3/10/1962)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 July 1902 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 1903 to 21 January 1904. He died on 3 October 1962, aged 83 years.

 

Gillard, Charles Whitney ( - 9/8/1905)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in 1871 and with his regiment (15th Hussars) saw service in South Africa from January to November 1991. He died on 19 August 1905 in Sidmouth.

 

Gillespie, Samuel Duff (8/2/1849 - 19/2/1940)

Born at Ballymena on 8 February 1849 he qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 15 April 1874 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 13 October 1899 to 12 December 1902. After the war he returned to England.

It is recorded that he also served in Indian where he took part in the Afghan War. During the Boer War he was for a time stationed in the Argentine where he supervise the embarkation of 25 000 horses to South Africa. He retired from the army in 1904 but was re-employed during World War I on embarkation duties at Dublin and Belfast. He married in 1892 and had one daughter. He died at Malahide, Dublin on 19 February 1940.

 

Gillett, Edward Scott C.I.E. (1877 - 4/3/1952)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 13 July 1900 and saw service with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 2 November 1901 to 20 October 1902. After the war he returned to England. From 1915 - 1920 he was Deputy Director of Remounts in India. He died in Tucson, Arizona on 4 March 1952, aged 75 years.

 

Gladstone, W. (6/1/1850 - 13/10/1900)

Born on 6 January 1850 he qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) in 1874 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer in South Africa on two occasions viz. 1879 - 1900. The Vet Record of 28 April 1900 records that at the time he was on the sick list in hospital at Pietermaritzburg while serving as a Major (V) in the Royal 1st Dragoons. He died on 13 October 1900.

 

Glasse, Maxwell St. Glasse (1873 - 17/10/1940)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 23 May 1898 and saw service with the A.V.D. in South Africa from 15 April 1902 and 13 October 1902. After the war he returned to England. He died on 17 October 1940, aged 67 years.

 

Glover, Benjamin Lucas (21/12/1848 - 18/4/1904)

Born on 21 December 1848, he qualified MRCVS (London) in April 1870. He served with the A.V.D. in South Africa as a Veterinary Officer with F. Duck and was attached to the Royal Artillery from 1878 to 1879. During the former year he wrote a pamphlet entitled "Suggestions for the general management of horses and mules while on field service in Natal and the neighbouring countries, with notes concerning their more common ailments". He took part in the Frontier (Kaffir) War of 1877 - 1978 as well as the Zulu War of 1879, the Transvaal War of 1881 and the Tirah Campaign of 1897/98. He and Duck travelled a great deal during the period 1878 to 1879 and their visits to the Orange River Republic, Basutoland and the Transvaal Republic probably made them the first Veterinary Surgeons to have entered those areas. He died on 18 April 1904.

 

Golden, Francis Charles ( - 13/9/1947)

He quailed MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 23 April 1885. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 13 September 1947.

 

Goodall, Major Alexander (2/9/1879 - 6/4/1930)

Major Goodall was born on 2 September 1879 and educated at Charterhouse. He graduated MRCVS (London) on 15 July 1902 and on 4 October 1902 together with W.H. Chase, J.H.L. Lyons and R. Paine joined the Cape of Good Hope Veterinary Department. It is recorded that in 1908 he was stationed at Worcester (Cape) as Government Veterinary Officer. He took his FRCVS in 1921, his thesis being "The Anthrax problem in South Africa". After the formation of Union he transferred to the Union Veterinary Field Services and was promoted to Senior Veterinary Officer in charge of the Orange Free State on 15 April 1918. During World War I he served as a Captain in the SAVC. In 1920 he was transferred to South West Africa as Officer in Charge of Agriculture and Veterinary Services in succession to Col. G.W. Lee (MRCVS) the first Civil Director of the mandated territory. In December 1924 he was transferred to take charge of the Eastern Cape Division and was stationed at Queenstown (He was succeeded in S.W.A. by R.S. Garraway). After a few months he was promoted to the post of Assistant Principal Veterinary Officer, Pretoria and in 1927 he took over the post of Sub-Director and Lecturer in Municipal Veterinary Hygiene at Onderstepoort. While proceeding on leave to Hermanus he died on route at Wolmaransstad on 6 April 1930 and was buried at Pretoria on 7 April 1930. In 1910/11 in Kokstad he was earning 350 pounds per annum.

 

Goodall, Francis Welborn ( - February 1966)

As a MRCVS (London) on 22 December 1923 he was registered as a Veterinary Surgeon in South Africa between 1956 and 1960. At the time he was living at 14 Fricker Road, Illovo, Johannesburg and 209 Eare Ridge Court, Central Avenue, Illovo, Johannesburg. Nothing more is known about him other than that he died in February 1966.

 

Goodliff, G. (1865 - 1/5/1924)

All that is known of this man is that he was an MRCVS (London) 4 July 1887 and served as a Captain in the SAVC during World War I. He enlisted as a Sergeant and was only commissioned on 28 February 1915. He died on 1 May 1924, aged 59 years.

 

Goulé, Arthur ( - 12/9/1918)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in 1871 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. during the Boer War. Prior to this he was working at Melbourne Veterinary College, Australia. On 7 December 1905 he joined the Natal Civil Veterinary Department as was stationed at Allerton Laboratory until 1909. In 1916 he volunteered for service with the Royal Army Veterinary Corps and saw active service in France. On 12 September 1918 he was drowned at sea when the Galway Castle was torpedoed.

 

Goundry, Charles (1874 - 26/8/1912)

Very little is known about this man other than that he was born in England in 1874 and graduated MRCVS from the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh in 1897. He came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department during the Boer War. On 25 October 1902 however, he joined the Cape Civil Veterinary Department. In 1908 he was stationed at Aliwal North as Government Veterinary Officer. He died at Malmesbury on 26 August 1912 while stationed there.

 

Graf, Herman (23/8/1898 - 7/6/1960)

Born on 23 August 1898 in Johannesburg, he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in 1925, having obtained the BSc degree (UP) in 1922. In 1932 he was awarded the degree of DVSc (UP).

On 4 February 1926 he took up an appointment as Veterinary Research Officer at Onderstepoort and from 1927 he served as Lecturer in Biochemistry and later (1929) in Chemical Pathology at the Veterinary Faculty. For the next 25 years he alone was responsible for the training of Veterinary Students in Chemical Pathology. On 3 November 1954 he was promoted to the post of Deputy Director of Veterinary Services and from January 1956, he took on the additional task as Dean of the Veterinary Faculty.

During World War II he was interned from 25 September 1941 to 11 December 1945. During his lifetime he was a member of the following scientific organisations:

1. South African Academy for the Advancement of Science (from 1926)

2. SAVMA (from 1926)

3. Foundation member of the Faculty of Science of the South African Academy

4. South Africa Forestry Society from its inception in 1937

5. South African Botanical Society (from 1935)

6. Veterinary Council (1935 and 1956 to 1960)

He died of a heart attack while on duty on 7 June 1960.

 

Gray, Charles Elias (10/4/1864 - 11/6/1937)

He was born on 10 April 1864 in England and as a Post Office telegraphist saw active service with the 24th Middelsex Regiment (P.O. Regiment) in the relief of Gordon of Kartoum. On his return from this campaign he attended the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College in Edinburgh and qualified MRCVS on 28 May 1890. He thereafter went to America to seek his fortune, but found employment very scarce. Later however, he found work as an Assistant to an MRCVS colleague in Philadelphia, but after earning sufficient money to return home, he sailed for England.

After a three-week visit to his family he set out for South Africa at the end of 1895 hoping to obtain work as a Veterinary Surgeon. Veterinary work was however, unobtainable so he reverted to his original training and became a telegraphist at Macloutsi on 1 January 1896. When Rinderpest broke out in Rhodesia two months later, the Rhodesian authorities approached Duncan Hutcheon, Chief Veterinary Officer of the Cape of Good Hope for assistance, but he referred them to Gray's presence in their country. Gray was requested to come to Bulawayo to take charge of the disease outbreak and in confirming the diagnosis, he was probably the first veterinarian to see Rinderpest south of the Zambezi River. He immediately instituted a slaughter out policy with compensation as well as a permit system to control cattle movement. However, the eruption of the Matabele rebellion put a stop to his work and being unemployed once again he joined the Army and was attached to C. Selous, H. Troop of the Bulawayo Field Force. After the Matabele Rebellion, veterinary work was still unobtainable so he turned once more to telegraphy to earn a living. This time he was posted to various parts of Rhodesia, finally becoming Postmaster at Victoria. Gray was then appointed Government Veterinary Surgeon in Victoria and was sent to the Cape on secondment for six months for Rinderpest control duties in the Transkei. The years 1900 - 1905 were very trying to Gray, but on hearing of S. Stockman's return to England at the end of 1904, he applied for his post as Principal Veterinary Officer, Transvaal and was accepted. On 12 January 1909 he attended the Pan African Congress held in Pretoria to correspond with the official opening of the Research Institute at Onderstepoort. He served as P.V.O. Transvaal until the declaration of Union in 1910 and then on 1 January 1911 was appointed as the first Principal Veterinary Surgeon of the Union of South Africa.

In this post he served until he retired from official duties on 9 May 1921. In 1917 he led a team of South African veterinarians to Tanganyika to combat Rinderpest. He settled in Jersey after his retirement and died at St. Hellier on 11 June 1937.

 

Greathead, Michael Merrimen (17/10/1926 - 7/11/1990)

Born in Grahamstown on 17 October 1926, he was educated at St. Andrew's College. At the end of 1948 he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort. Thereafter he was employed as follows:

1. 1949 - 1953: Private practice Pinetown and Pretoria

2. August 1953 - 1974: Johannesburg Municipality. Milk Hygiene and Abattoir Management

3. 1974 - 1978: Abattoir Corporation City Deep and East London Abattoirs

4. 1978: Rejoined Johannesburg Municipality Health Department

Other achievements were:

1. 1972 obtained a B. Comm degree through Unisa

2. 1981 DVPH degree (University of Pretoria)

3. 30 years External Examiner Veterinary Public Health (UP)

4. National Examiner Meat Hygiene and Public Health

5. Part time Lecturer Witwatersrand Medical School

6. Part time Lecturer Witwatersrand Technikon

7. 1987 made Fellow of the Institute of Public Health

8. 1989 made Honorary Member of the Transvaal Consultative Association for Health Services

9. Served on Livestock Welfare Co-ordinating Committee

10. Served on SPCA Liaison Committee

11. Served on SABS Committees

12. Committee Member of SAVA Public Health Group

He died in Johannesburg on 7 November 1990 after a long illness.

 

Green, Walter G. (1874 - 22/6/1948)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21 May 1898. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He sailed for Cape Town on 20 December 1899 via New York and New Orleans where a load of mules was collected for use in South Africa. After the war he returned to England. He died on 22 June 1948, aged 74 years.

 

Green, William John Burger (27/5/1901 - 1/6/1936)

"Till" Green was born in Krugersdorp on 27 May 1901 and graduated BVSc from the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1924. In 1925 he was appointed Veterinary Research Officer in the Department of Bacteriology at Onderstepoort Laboratory. From 5 November 1928 to 1930 he was in charge of Allerton Laboratory. In 1930 he returned to Onderstepoort but shortly afterwards undertook a three year Bovine T.B. survey in Durban. He returned to Allerton Laboratory in 1933 for a short while and finally returned to Onderstepoort in 1934. In 1930 he married Miss Little of Pietermaritzburg. He died in his sleep of heart failure (Myocardial Degeneration) on 1 June 1936 at his home at Onderstepoort.

 

Greenfield, Herbert O.B.E. ( - 27/6/1963)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 19 July 1901 and served in South Africa for an unknown period of time with the Army Veterinary Department during the Boer War. He subsequently returned to South Africa for a second tour of duty from 16 May 1903 to 21 December 1903.

 

Gregory, Frank ( - 21/2/1906)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in May 1890 and served with the 18th battalion of the Imperial Yeomanry (Rhodesian Field Force) during the Boer War. During the period 3 April 1901 - 17 November 1901 he also served as Veterinary Officer (Captain) to the South African Constabulary. From 1902 he served as a Captain in the Scottish Horse Regiment in South Africa. His place in the Scottish Horse was taken by E. Kellett. After the Boer War he practiced in Johannesburg. He died on 21 February 1906 in Johannesburg.

 

Gresham, Francis Baker (1870 - 16/11/1954)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17 July 1897. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Newark-on-Trent, Notts on 16 November 1954, aged 84 years.

 

Gribben, Andrew P. (1861 - 27/9/1941)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 30 May 1892 and saw service in South Africa during the Boer War with the 1st New South Wales Mounted Rifles. He took part in the action at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding. He died on 27 September 1941, aged 80 years.

 

Gridley, William B. (1868 - 1/7/1910)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 19 December 1889. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 1 July 1910, aged 42 years.

 

Griffith, John Joseph D.S.O. (1871 - 23/7/1939)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 23 May 1893 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. Officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Cape Colony) from 1 July 1899 to 12 December 1905. After service he returned to England. He died on 23 July 1939, aged 68 years.

 

Grist, Albert George (26/3/1871 - 9/5/1952)

Grist was born in Torquay on 26 March 1871 and qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 December 1892. He came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon with the Army Veterinary Department during the Boer War. After the war (1903) with D. Aitchison, he undertook official field duties in the Orange Free State and in 1905 became Principal Veterinary Officer being stationed at Bloemfontein in succession to T. Flintoff. He was Veterinarian to the Bloemfontein Turf Club from April 1918 - 8 May 1919 and again from 1923 - 1926. On 4 November 1926 he transferred to Queenstown. He retired from official duties on 31 January 1927 and went farming in the Dargle (Natal) district. In 1936 he took a post graduate course in London an in 1937 returned to the profession and started practice at Cowies Hill, Natal. He finally retired to England in 1959 and died in Devon on 9 May 1962, aged 91 years. He is reported to have been a magnificent horseman and at the age of 73 was still riding in gymkhanas. For some or other reason he referred to himself as Bertram Grist on his prescription pad in 1946.

On 12 January 1909 he attended the Pan African Veterinary Congress held at Pretoria to correspond with the official opening of the Research Institute at Onderstepoort.

 

Grobler, Jurie Hendrik (8/2/1944 - 14/12/1984)

Born on 8 February 1944 he obtained the BVSc degree at the University of Pretoria in December 1967. After qualifying as a veterinarian he was employed as follows:

1. 1968 to 31 October 1969: Private practice on his own

2. 1 November 1969 - 31 October 1970: State Veterinarian, Transvaal

3. 1 November 1970 - 31 May 1972: Assistant to Dr B.F. Rudolph, Kempton Park

4. 1 June 1972 - 31 May 1973: Assistant to Dr S.L. Snyders, Boksburg

5. 1 June 1973 - 31 May 1980: Private practice on his own

6. 1 June 1980 - 14 December 1984: State Veterinarian, Meat Hygiene, Western Cape and the Stellenbosch Regional Veterinary Laboratory

He committed suicide on 14 December 1984 at Stellenbosch by gassing himself in his motorcar after writing several lengthy suicide notes. He was buried in Zeerust, Transvaal.

 

Grosskopf, Prof Johan (11/9/1928 - 25/9/2002)

Prof Grosskopf’s association with the Faculty of Veterinary Science stretched over an extended period from 1962 through to 1989.  He contributed significantly to teaching, research and academic administration within the Faculty serving as Professor and Head of the Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and toxicology from 1978 until his retirement in 1989.  From 1981 until 1989 Prof Grosskopf also served as Deputy Dean.

 Farming was one of Prof Grosskopf’s passions and his herd of Bonsmara cattle brought him great joy.  Through his interest in farming he became involved in (amongst others) the South African Stud Book and Livestock Improvement Association, the Advisory Board for Animal Production, the Percheron Horse Breeders Association and the Bonsmara Cattle Breeders Association of which he was President from 1989 to 1993.  He also served on the South African Veterinary Council and as an executive member of the Production and Reproduction Group of the South African Veterinary Association.

 Prof Grosskopf’s expertise in both the fields of veterinary science and agriculture were widely recognized and he frequently contributed as a consultant and advisor.  A long list of awards and honorary positions are testimony to the recognition of his many talents.

 Even in his retirement, Johan was always willing to help student and colleague alike, always the gentlemen, Johan Grosskopf’s friendly presence will be sadly missed by his colleagues.  The Faculty extends its deepest sympathy to his wide Igna and his family.  May they find solace and strength in their hour of need.

 

Gudgin, Tom Parinder (1831 - 1/5/1903)

Born in 1831 he qualified MRCVS (London) in 1850. During 1879 he saw service with the A.V.D. in Natal. In Natal he served as Principal Veterinary Surgeon in charge of Duck, Burt, Fenton, Glover, Haggar, Healy, Killick, Moore, Morgan, Phillips, Raymond, Walters, Longhurst and Lambert and possibly also Gladstone and Rayment. He remained P.V.S. of the Army Veterinary Department until the end of 1879 when he was succeeded by S. Longhurst. It is also recorded that he saw service with the Cavalry in the Crimean war from 1955 to1857 and also during the Indian Mutiny.

 

Hawden, S.

As a veterinary graduate of McGill University where he qualified in 1902 he accompanied the 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles to South Africa during the Boer War, but arrived too late for action in May 1902. After the war he returned to Canada.

 

Hagger, William Robert ( - 2/12/1903)

The only information of this man is that he served as a Veterinary Surgeon (MRCVS (London) in March 1875) during the Zulu War of 1879. He arrived in Natal aboard the "Olympus" as one of 12 Veterinary Surgeons in the reinforcement column. He died in Bombay on 2 December 1903.

 

Haig, David Arthur O.B.E. (20/3/1913 - 21/2/1987)

Born in Johannesburg on 20 March 1913 he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in December 1936. Thereafter he spent 8 years in the field and at Allerton RVL working particularly on bacterial diseases of cattle and poultry. In 1945 he transferred to the Department of Virology at Onderstepoort where he developed a canine distemper vaccine which was to become standard throughout the world. After serving for a time at Kabete Veterinary Laboratory in Kenya (1959 - 1961) he transferred to the Agricultural Research Council's (Compton) Field Station where he became the first Head of the Virology Department. He did excellent research work on Scrapie. In 1967 he also took over as Head of the Bacteriology Department at Compton.

As a child he contracted Polio which became complicated by Osteomyelitis. He officially retired in 1977. He died at Whitechurch, Reading, Berkshire on 21 February 1987 having left South Africa after a short holiday on 17 February 1987. An obituary notice to him was published in the Times of London on 5 March 1987 and in the Veterinary Record on 14 March 1987. It is believed that he lost a son from Rabies.

 

Hall, William Burray (25/6/1849 - 1/7/1929)

As a veterinary graduate of McGill University he served with the Quebec Field Battery from 22 June 1877. On 29 January 1887 he was appointed to the Royal Canadian Artillery (Permanent Force) but transferred on 1 July 1893 to the Royal Canadian Dragoons. He accompanied this regiment to South Africa on 29 December 1899 and took part in operations in the Orange River Colony and Transvaal during 1900.

 

Hamilton, James Robert Roe ( - 31/7/1939)

Born in Roscommon County in Ireland, he qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 19 December 1894 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department towards the end of the Boer War. In 1903 he joined the Orange Free State Veterinary Department and was posted to Bloemfontein as District Veterinary Officer. In 1905 he became the first assistant to the Principal Veterinary Officer, Orange Free State (A.G. Grist). He continued to serve in the Orange Free State until 1915 when he was transferred to Durban where he spent the last 9 years of his service before retirement in 1924. He died on 31 July 1939. It is recorded that he attended the inaugural meeting of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on16 February 1903.

 

Hamlyn, William Petrie ( - 2/3/1962)

No record can be found of Hamlyn's date or place of birth. He qualified MRCVS (London) on 18 July 1912. Records show that he came to South Africa in 1913 and entered the Civil Veterinary Department in the Cape Colony. He was stationed as Government Veterinary Officer in Cape Town, East London, Umtata, Komga (3 June 1927 to 16 July 1931) and Johannesburg after J. Chalmers. In this latter post he retired from the service on 22 February 1937 after 23 years of service (He was succeeded as G.V.O. Johannesburg by V. Cooper from Estcourt). On retirement he settled at Umkomaas and set up a small private practice. He died there on 2 March 1962.

It is recorded that he was very deaf and for many years was in charge of the quarantine station in Durban. It is also recorded that on 11 February 1933 he diagnosed an outbreak of Foot and Mouth disease at Germiston. His diagnosis was confirmed by P.S. Snyman and E.M. Robinson.

 

Harber, Lieut. Col. Augustus Frederick D.S.O. (2/11/1875 - 22/6/1966)

Born in Gloucestershire on 2 November 1875 he qualified MRCVS in London on 14 July 1897 and won the Fitzwygram Prize of 50 pounds for that year as the student who obtained the highest marks at the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons final examinations. It is recorded that he and two of his classmates were interviewed in England by Sir Arnold Theiler for appointment to the Civil Veterinary Department of

the Natal Government. He served the Natal Government and subsequently the Veterinary Division of the Union of South Africa from 1898 (having been recruited together with Cordy, Byrne, Woollatt, Hutchinson, Amos and Ashe) to 1920 and was stationed at Darnall, Greytown, Pietermaritzburg and Durban. While at Pietermaritzburg he undertook the veterinary lectures to the Cedara students.

After his retirement from the Government Service he took up practice at Mooi River and from 1938 to 1947 served the Municipality of Durban as Veterinary Officer (having taken over the post vacated by W.A. Dykins), and Lecturer/Demonstrator in meat inspection. He thereafter returned to practice until he finally retired in 1955. He died on 22 June 1966 and is buried in Durban.

Harber had a very distinguished military career. During the Boer War he served as a Lieutenant in the Imperial Light Horse and was awarded service bars for service in the Transvaal, the Relief of Ladysmith as well as the Relief of Mafeking. He also served in the Zulu Rebellion of 1906. During World War I he served as a Major in the SAVC and was mentioned in Despatches by General Louis Botha. He was also awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).

During his lifetime he manufactured and distributed "Harber's Gallsickness Antitoxin" which was popular from the Cape to Rhodesia. His stepdaughter who subsequently became his wife, helped him to prepare the patent "Antitoxin" and informed the writer on 2 February 1983 (when she was 70 years old) that it was prepared from bile collected from cattle from the Golel area when slaughtered at Durban Abattoir. This bile was then formalised and in order to mask its identity, was coloured with cochineal.

 

Hare, John Berkeley Agar ( - 10/4/1947)

Before qualifying as a Veterinary Surgeon MRCVS (London) on 21 December 1888 he (with E.W. Larnder) served as a trooper in Methuen's Horse and took part in the Bechuanaland Campaign (Warren Expedition) of 1884 - 1995. He recorded that this expedition reached Mafeking on 11 March 1885. He died on 10 April 1947.

 

Hargrave, William (1781 - 2/5/1857)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in April 1804 and was Regimental Veterinary Surgeon to the 20th Light Dragoons which took part in the battle of Blouberg on 6 - 8 January 1806. After a very short stay at the Cape he departed with his regiment to take part in the Rio Plata expedition in August 1806. He died on 2 May 1857, aged 76 years.

 

Harrington, A.D.

As a veterinary graduate of McGill University he accompanied the 4th Canadian Rifles to South Africa in May 1902 for service in the Boer War. He returned shortly afterwards with the cessation of hostilities.

 

Harris, Charles Beresford Maule D.S.O. (1866 - 22/7/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 May 1890 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Natal) from 7 December 1898 to 15 November 1904. During the Boer War he was besieged at Ladysmith. He died at Leamington on 22 July 1931, aged 66 years. After leaving South Africa he served in the Somaliland Campaign on 1904. He also saw active service during World War I.

 

Harris, Percy John

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 30 March 1896 and served in South Africa for an unknown period of time with the A.V.D. during the Boer War. He subsequently returned to South Africa for a second tour of duty from 3 May 1913 to 19 September 1914. In the London Gazette of 18 May 1897 it is recorded that he was appointed Vet. Lieut. In succession to Capt. E.E. Bennett (See Reilly page ...).

 

Hart, Andrew (1871 - 23/6/1955)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 18 December 1894 and during the Boer war saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died at Ardnadam, Argyllshire on 23 June 1955, aged 84.

 

Hartig, R.E. (1884 - 1956)

Born in 1884 he qualified in Dresden in 1906 and subsequently took his D.V.M. in Zurich. After qualifying he entered the German Army and took part in the Herero War. From 1908 to 1919 he was placed in charge of a large farming operation in South West Africa. In 1919 he opened his own laboratory in Stellenbosch to study Lamsiekte. He however, clashed with Sir Arnold Theiler and so gave up the venture. From 1922 to 1928 he was in Germany studying the diseases of fur bearing animals. In 1929 he established a practice in Cape Town and then Paarl. He was interned during World War II from 1940 to 1943. Thereafter he practiced in Pretoria (Arian Buildings, Voortrekker Road) before moving to Koppies in 1953. In 1954 he specialised in undertaking locums and died suddenly while doing such a locum in Marandellas in Rhodesia in 1956.

 

Harvey, George J. ( - 1934)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 22 May 1891 and saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon. During the Rinderpest Epizootic of 1897 he served with the Cape Civil Veterinary Department. He subsequently returned to England. He may have died in 1934.

 

Haslam, Capt. Alfred Joseph (1863 - 23/7/1898)

He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) in April 1884, when he won the Fitzwygram third prize. All that is known of this man is that he was a member of the Army Veterinary Department in Natal when in early August 1897, he represented the Colony of Natal at a conference in Pretoria which had been called by the Government of the ZAR for the purpose of discussing the best methods of combating Rinderpest. At the time he was actually stationed in Uganda on secondment as Transport Officer on the Uganda Railways and was only in Natal for a brief period for the purpose of purchasing mules. On his return to East Africa he was seconded to Kenya for Rinderpest control duties and while "superintending preventive treatment" he entered kikuyu territory where he was murdered by the Wakikuyu on the 23rd of July 1898. He was buried at Ford Smith, Kenya and the inscription of his gravestone reads "In memory of Captain A.J. Haslam, Army Veterinary Department, BA, MD, CM, FRCVS. Killed by the Wakikuyu 23rd July 1898, aged 34 years. Erected by his friends and the staff of the Uganda Railway". It is also recorded that he took his medical degree at Edinburgh in 1893. In 1895 he demonstrated that roaring in horses is due to the flattening of the left Recurrent nerve around the Aorta.

 

Hawes, Arthur P. ( - 3/7/1938)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 10 May 1893. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 3 July 1938 at Pencticton, Vancouver after 32 years service with the Canadian Government.

 

Hay, William (19/11/1893 - 21/4/1989)

Born on a farm near Cornhill, Banffshire, Scotland on 19 November 1893, he was educated at Robert Gordon's College, Aberdeen and the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh, where he received his MRCVS in July 1915. Thereafter he joined the army at Edinburgh Castle and posted to the Royal Army Veterinary Corps. In 1916 he underwent army veterinary training at Aldershot and subsequently went to Woolwich where he was put in charge of 100 recruits for the Army Veterinary Corps before being posted to France.

After landing at Le Havre he was posted to No. 19 Veterinary Hospital at Rouen. In April 1916, he was transferred to the 21st British Division as a Field Veterinary Officer, his A.D.V.S. being Major Duncan McDonald a time serving officer (qualified MRCVS 1899, New Edinburgh). The latter put Hay in veterinary charge of all the infantry transport horses and mules of the three brigades of the 62nd, 63rd, 64th Division each consisting of four battalions of infantry. To this was subsequently add the horse/mule transport of other artillery, engineering and mounted units. The 21st Division was then in intensive training for the Somme offensive which commenced on the 1st of July 1916. The 63rd Brigade was virtually exterminated in the initial advance and a few days later it was replaced by the 110th Brigade (3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Leicester Regiments).

Hay remained with the 21st Division from April 1916 and on March 21st 1918, when the Germans made their last major attempt to break the line he was wounded by a German howitzer shell while in a sunken road, where he was taking shelter from the barrage. His left thigh was penetrated by a piece of shell and rendered useless. He was carried out on an empty artillery wagon which was returning for more ammunition. He was eventually invalided back to England (to Somerville Ladies College, Oxford - which had become a military officers' hospital), where he received surgery and treatment lasting about three months.

When fully fit and doing light duty on the Kent Coast, he was, in September 1918, posted to India to do 5 years foreign service, then the rule for all permanent officers of the A.V.C. (now R.A.V.C.). He had already received promotion and permanent ranking for his services. He arrived in India and was posted to Poona, where he celebrated World War I victory on November 11th 1918.

In 1919 he was posted from Poona to Secunderabad (large Veterinary hospital) and subsequently Bangalore for a period before returning to Secunderabad.

Early in 1920 he resigned his commission in the RAVC and immigrated to South Africa, arriving in July 1920 with another young fellow (not a veterinarian) also from India. He left for South West Africa with a view to settle there.

In January 1921 he was engaged by P.V.O. A. Goodall as a temporary Veterinary Officer at Windhoek, but was posted in sequence to Okahandja, Grootfontein and Keetmanshoop during the following two years. In 1923 he resigned his appointment and went to Durban, where he opened a practice in Berea Road. He also accepted an appointment under J. Chalmers (MRCVS) as a Meat Examiner when he was engaged at the Federated Meat Industries' Abattoir Durban as Chief Veterinary Officer for the Italian Meat Contract then in operation.

In 1925 he accepted an appointment with the Public Health Department, Kimberley as Veterinarian controlling the inspection of meat supplies in that area, their being no municipal abattoir regular inspection of meat. Butchers and farmers were supplying uninspected meat to the public. He re-drafted Municipal regulations which were passed by the Cape Provincial Council and re-organised compulsory inspection of all meat entering the municipal area.

In 1927 he was offered and accepted an appointment as Government Officer at the Lobatsi Abattoir which had been erected by the Imperial Cold Storage, for the export of beef, but as the industry never got started, he was occupied in normal veterinary duties as a Field Officer. From 1927 to 1943 he was engaged in normal veterinary district duties at various stations in Bechuanaland viz. Lobatsi, Palapye, Francistown and Maun.

In 1943 he was appointed Director of Veterinary Services, Bechuanaland in succession to J.H.N. Hobday (MRCVS) and stationed at Mafeking. In 1946 he was transferred to Basutoland as Director and retired there on the 31st December 1948 after reaching the age limit of 55. He was succeeded as Director in Bechuanaland by E.C.S. Daw, MRCVS.

In 1949 he was offered an appointment as a Veterinary Officer (temporary) by the Northern Rhodesian Government and was stationed at Livingstone where he was primarily engaged in the control of live cattle introduced for slaughter from various neighbouring territories, mostly through Kazangula and either re-consigned them live from Livingstone to various other centres or slaughtered them at the Livingstone Government Abattoir for reconsignment as frozen meat.

In 1956 he resigned this appointment and retired to live in Bulawayo with his family and did not again engage in regular veterinary operations until 1963 where he was invited by the Ethiopian Government (with the approval of the British Government) to supervise the construction and operation of an up-to-date abattoir towards which Great Britain had made a grant of about a million pounds. This abattoir was intended to assist the development of an export industry in meat, the number of cattle in Ethiopia (although small animals) being considered to exceed those of South Africa and Rhodesia combined. He accepted this invitation on a year's contract i.e. from October 1963 to November 1964, but he found 40% of the slaughter stock to be infected with measles as well another severe obstacles to a healthy economy. He was pleased when his contract expired as he saw no hope for the industry. His opinion subsequently proved to be correct.

He joined the S.A. Veterinary Association while stationed at Windhoek, S.W.A. in May 1921 and valued his membership and was (after paying membership fees for 20 or more years) admitted to Honorary Life Membership.

Also, as a matter of purely historial interest, he records in a letter to the author, that he witnessed the battle of Delville wood as his Division of the B.E.F. was linked with the 9th (Scottish) Division of which the South African contingent formed the Reserve Brigade. This was in mid-July 1916. Leaving his horse tethered, he picked his way to rising ground where could observe the wood under bombardment by heavy shellfire. "The wood was wreathed in smoke from shell fire and many trees were splintered with broken branches everywhere". He returned to England in 1984 where he died at Purton, Wiltshire on 21st April 1989 at the age of nearly 96 years.

It must be recorded that he practiced spiritualism and that while he was employed in Bechuanaland he did all his travelling on a Harley Davidson motorcycle with his personal servant on the pillion. In this way he would travel direct from Meat Board meetings in Pretoria to Maun, a journey which at that time took several days.

 

Hayes, Matthew Horace (1842 - 31/8/1904)

Having obtained his MRCVS (New Edinburgh) in 1883 and his FRCVS he served in the Royal Artillery in India before coming to South Africa in 1892 not as a soldier, but as a riding showman. In this capacity he wrote numerous books on horses including "Veterinary Notes for Horse Owners", "Points of the Horse", "Horses on Board Ship", "Among Horses in Russia", "Among Horses in South Africa" and "Among Men and Horses".

During the Boer War he returned to South Africa and served as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. He died at Southsea on 31 August 1904, aged 62 years.

 

Hazeel, Harry A. ( - 22/1/1925)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 23 December 1892. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He died on 22 January 1925.

 

Head, Alfred Searle C.M.G. (24/10/1874 - 9/1/1952)

Born at East Grinstead, Sussex on 24 October 1874, he qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 December 1897 and came to South Africa as a Lieutenant (Civil Veterinary Surgeon) attached to the A.V.D. during the Boer War. It is recorded that he served in South Africa from 13 April 1901 to 15 December 1903 and rose to the rank of Captain while acting as Veterinary Officer to the Inniskilling Dragoons. He is known to have kept excellent records e.g. he records that from November 1899 to June 1902 his regiment covered 6 116 miles and that 3 750 horses were expended. Of 4 290 horses used by his regiment, 4 170 received veterinary treatment, 163 for bullet wounds and 3 for schrapnel wounds. He published an excellent article on "The Wear and Tear of Horses during the South African War" (J1 Comp Path & Ther 1903). On completion of his tour of Military duty in South Africa he returned to England.

He subsequently married the daughter of a Veterinarian (Charles Coomber Hoadley MRCVS (London) 1874), and his son (Charles Searle) qualified MRCVS (London) 1933 as did his grandson John Charles MRCVS (London), 1972.

During World War I he served as Colonel Commandant of Pitt Corner, Winchester, Hampshire where horses were trained for cavalry use. For this work he was awarded the C.M.G. During World War II he again saw service as a Colonel in the home guard at Helston, Cornwall. He died at Helston on 9 January 1952.

 

Healy, Michael F. (8/3/1839 - 30/4/1921)

Born on 8 March 1839 he qualified MRCVS (London) on 1 May 1862. During 1979 he saw service with his regiment in Natal during the Zulu War of that year. He was attached to the column (with T.A. Killick) which advanced into Zululand along the coast under General Crealock. The other Veterinarian in this column was V.S. Killick. He died on 30 April 1921.

 

Hearn, Cecil George (November 1878 - March 1965)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 17 December 1900. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died in March 1965, aged 86 years.

 

Hearn, William Edward

He was registered as a Veterinarian under section 12, Act No. 16 of 1933 at its implementation. At that time he lived at "Kloof Kennels", Kloof Street, Cape Town.

 

Hearne, Edward O.B.E., C du O.M.A. (1883 - 3/2/1932)

He qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 19 December 1905 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 20 October 1909 to 19 September 1914. He died on 3 February 1932 at Malta while playing polo. He was then a Major in the RAVC, aged 49 years. During World War I he served in France and Belgium with the B.E.F. After the war he served with the army of occupation on the Rhine.

 

Heley, William James ( - 10/8/1909)

He qualified MRCVS (London) in March 1896 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon in the Army Veterinary Department. He died on 10 August 1909.

 

Hempstead, Frederick John D'Urban (30/10/1914 - )

Born in Durban on 30 October 1914, he matriculated at SACS in Cape Town and his MRCVS at Glasgow Veterinary College in July 1940. After qualifying he served as a G.V.O. at Umtata and East London before joining Dr Jack Boswell in practice in Johannesburg in January 1943. With Barry du Casse he started the first A.I. Centre in the Transvaal at Sundown Veterinary Clinic. In addition he served as:

1. Official Veterinarian to the White City & Wembly Dog Racing Club until they were closed.

2. Official Veterinarian to all six of the horse racing clubs on the Reef and two in Vereeniging

3. Joint Official to the Rand Easter Show and Thorobred Breeders' Association

4. External Examiner in Surgery at Onderstepoort 1958 to 1968.

In 1970 he gave up practice and started breeding racehorses near Alexandria, Cape. In 1982, due to ill health, he settled in Port Elizabeth where he died on 11 September 1990 after a long illness. In 1944 he married Miss Pat Papé in East London. Of this marriage a son and a daughter were born.

 

Henderson, George ( - November 1921)22

George Henderson qualified MRCVS at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh on 17 December 1889. The only records that can be traced of him are that on 25 February 1903 he transferred from the Natal Civil Veterinary Department to the Transvaal Civil Veterinary Department and was stationed at Lichtenburg. In November 1921 it was reported that he had died some time previously.

 

Henderson, Gilbert Thomas O.B.E. (30/3/1885 - 15/2/1970)

Born in Buttevante, County Cork, Ireland on 30 March 1885 he studied at Liverpool and Edinburgh and qualified MRCVS (Liverpool) on 17 December 1907. In 1911 he came to South Africa and was appointed by the Division of Veterinary Field Services to deal with East Coast Fever in Pondoland. There he worked extremely hard and it is recorded that he regularly rode 600 miles a month on horseback. He used to arrive at dip tanks so early that he was christened by the Xhosa "He who sleeps with his boots on".

In 1913 he was seconded to Nyasaland to deal with Trypanosomiasis and Rinderpest. He returned in 1914 and in 1916 was Government Veterinarian, Elliot where he remained until 19134 when he was posted to Kokstad on East Coast Fever and Sheep Scab control. In 1934 he was appointed Principal Veterinary Officer in Basutoland and was awarded the O.B.E. for his services to the Basuto people.

In 1946 he retired to Kokstad and set up practice. While practicing he still found time to serve on the Town Council for 9 years, five of which were as Mayor. In 1960 he gave up work and public life. He died on ± 15 February 1970 in Greys Hospital, Pietermaritzburg where he was cremated. At the time of his death he was the oldest veterinarian in South Africa.

 

Henderson, Robert

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 31 March 1896. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Henning, Michiel Wilhelm (27/10/1897 - 1/3/1962)

Born on the farm Denemarke in the Rouxville district of the Orange Free State on 27 October 1897 (1896) he and his family were interned in the Kraairivier concentration camp for 22 months during the Boer War. In 1915 he and a party of four other South African (P.J.J. Fourie, M.W. Sheppard, C.P. Neser and B.S. Parkin) proceeded to Dublin to study Veterinary Science. He, together with the other four obtained his MRCVS on 9 July 1919 when he was also awarded the Fitzwygram Second Prize for the best Veterinary Student in the British Isles.

After qualifying as a veterinarian he returned to South Africa and following on service with the Division of Veterinary Field Services he transferred to Onderstepoort as Lecturer in Anatomy at the Veterinary Faculty. Subsequently he was appointed Professor of Veterinary Science at the University of Pretoria. This position he held until he retired. Thereafter he was employed by the Department of Agriculture until his death on 1 March 1962.

In 1938 he was awarded the DVSc degree by the University of South Africa for his thesis "The Antigenic Structure of Salmonellas obtained from Domestic Animals and Birds in South Africa". Although he received international acclaim as an authority on the Salmonellas, he was best known for his monumental textbook "Animal Diseases in South Africa".

 

Henning, Otto (21/11/1865 - 10/11/1933)

Born in Germany on 21 November 1865 he qualified Dr. Med. Vet. At Stuttgart in 1885. In March 1892 he was appointed Assistant Veterinary Surgeon to the Cape of Good Hope Administration with headquarters at Cape Town where he remained until 1896.

On 1 November 1896 he was sent to the Orange Free State to assist with the control of Rinderpest. In 1897 he returned to the Orange Free State Republic and served as State Veterinarian until 1900. Thereafter his career became very checkered e.g.:

1900 - 1901 He was Divisional Veterinary Officer to the S.A. Constabulary

1901 - 1902 He was Government Veterinary Surgeon to the Basutoland Government

1902 - 1903 He was Principal Veterinary Officer to the Orange River Colony

1904 - 1907 He served in the Repatriation Department

In 1907 he was appointed Chief of Agriculture in South West Africa until he was imprisoned by the South African Forces when they captured that territory in 1915. In 1921 he was reinstated and served as Government Veterinary Officer, Keetmanshoop until 1923. He died at Grootfontein S.W.A. on 10 November 1933, aged 68 years.

In 1938 his widow presented the South African Veterinary Medical Association with a complete set of official Cape of Good Hope Agricultural Journals for the years 1890 - 1895. It is also recorded of Otto Henning that he assisted the Government of the Bechuanaland Protectorate with the control of Rinderpest, being stationed at Palapye. In this capacity he met Sir Arnold Theiler and discussed the disease with him on 3 April 1897 while the latter was proceeding to Mafeking (Presumably from Rhodesia).

 

Hepburn, William (1877 - 1/5/1942)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 24 May 1900. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 1 May 1942, aged 67 years.

 

Herriot, James (//1917 - 28/2/1995

James Herriot described by his one time partner in practice as “the world’s best known and best loved vet” has died aged 78.

Herriot, the pen name of James Alfred Wight, became a household name through his novels about life as a Yorkshire vet.  He died at his hom in Thirsk, North Yorkshire, after a long illness on 28 February 1995.

Although best known as an author, he did not begin writing until the age of 50, after nearly 30 years as a vet.  He produced his books on an old Olivetti typewriter.  Herriot’s novels, All Creatures Great and Small and It Shouldn’t Happen to a Vet among others, were based on his experiences in practice.

The entertaining anecdotes about eccentric farmers and sick animals, became bestsellers in the 1970s and were turned into a popular BBC television series.  

Herriot was born in Sunderland, northern England, and grew up in Glasgow.  He attended Glasgow Veterinary College and moved to Yorkshire in 1940 after qualifying as a vet.

 

Hewlett, Kenelm O.B.E. ( - 7/12/1937)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 July 1900. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died on 7 December 1937.

 

Heydenrych, Robert Jacob (28/5/1918 - 12/1/1978)

Born on 28 May 1918 in Jansenville he obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort at the end of 1942. While waiting for his military call up, he worked as Assistant to S.T.A. Amos in Durban. From late 1943 he served as a Captain in the SAVC until 1946. During this time he was connected with the transporting of mules to India and Burma and food hygiene for troops and troop ships. In 1946 he opened a practice in Newlands (Cape) in which he remained until his death on 12th January 1978. He married in 1944 and two sons were born of the marriage.

 

Hill, Frank MacKley (17/7/1867 - 17/11/1940)

Born in Adelaide, Australia he was raised by an aunt in England and qualified MRCVS (London) on 16 May 1890. He appears to have seen service in South Africa on several occasions. Firstly with the Rhodesian Horse Regiment during the Matabele Rebellion on 1896/97 and as a C.V.S. attached to the A.V.D. during the Boer War. He then served for 10 years in India, returning to South Africa in 1910 or 1912. In South Africa he served as G.V.O. Bulwer in 1913 and thereafter transferred

to Ladysmith (Natal) from where he was sent on active service to East Africa during World War I. After his return to civil duties he was transferred to Mafeking where in 1921 he met his old friend W.H. Chase who persuaded him to join the Bechuanaland Protectorate Government as a G.V.O. In this service he was stationed at Mahalapye, Palapye and finally Francistown (1924) on Lungsickness control. He retired in 1930 and settled in Pietermaritzburg for a few years before settling in New Zealand and finally Australia (Palmwoods) where he died on 17 November 1940.

It is recorded that in 1920, he together with C.E. Gray and H.H. Curson, formed the South African contingent sent to Tanganyika to combat Rinderpest.

 

Hill, Walter ( - 14/2/1906)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) in 1887 and came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. During 1897 he was attached to the Cape Colony Civil Veterinary Department and assisted at Kimberley with the control of Rinderpest during the Epizootic of that year. He served with the A.V.D. throughout the Boer Ware and after the cessation of hostilities was employed by the Repatriation Department from 1902 to 1905. On 1 November 1905 he joined the Orange Free State Civil Veterinary Department and was in their employ when he died at Senekal on 14 February 1906 from blood poisoning contracted from a post mortem examination.

 

Hines, Arthur James (1877 - 24/7/1958)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 18 September 1897 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England. He died there on 24 July 1958, aged 81 years.

 

Hingston, Clayton Love

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) in April 1878 and during the Boer War saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department. After the war he returned to England.

 

Hirst, William H. ( - 5/5/1900)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 14 July 1898 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinarian attached to the A.V.D. He became ill at Dronfield, Kimberley and died at Boshof on 5 May 1900 of Enteric Fever. He was buried in the West End Cemetary, Kimberley.

 

Hobday, Elizabeth May O.B.E. (2/1911 - 18/2/1978)

Born E.M. Chapman at Gillingham, Kent in February 1911, she qualified MRCVS (London) on 2 December 1933. Later she married a colleague, J.H.N. Hobday and with him settled in Mafeking when he served as a Veterinary Officer and later Director of Veterinary Services in the Bechuanaland Protectorate Veterinary Department. They subsequently transferred to the Northern Rhodesian service where she was in charge of the Veterinary Laboratory at Mazabuka. After her divorce from her husband she joined the Bechuanaland Protectorate Veterinary Department as office in charge of the central diagnostic laboratory, first at Ramathlabama and later at Gaberones (now Gaberone). She remained in this post until 1972 when she retired to Salisbury. She died there on 18 February 1978. She was awarded the O.B.E. for her work in Northern Rhodesia.

 

Hodder, Archibald ( - 7/11/1937)

Hodder qualified MRCVS at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh on 21 May 1898. He came to South Africa as a Civil Veterinarian attached to the A.V.D. during the Boer War and served as Veterinary Officer with the S.A. Constabulary from 31 November 1901 to 31 October 1903. He then resigned his official position and practiced in Bloemfontein. From 1905 to 1906 he served the Natal Government. He then left the Natal service and settled in Pietermaritzburg until the onset of World War I when he joined the S.A. Veterinary Corps and saw active service in South West Africa and Nyasaland. He was a very good artist and painted 50 water colours which were purchased by Howard Pim of Johannesburg. After World War I he served as lecturer in Veterinary Science at the Grootfontein College of Agriculture. His ex students talk of the beautiful black board drawings he used to illustrate his lectures. He could, for example, illustrate the various stages of parturition by means of drawings.

He was succeeded at Grootfontein by P.J.J. Fourie at the end of 1919 whereafter he settled in Johannesburg and opened a private practice. He died at the East Rand Hospital on 7 November 1937. He did not attend the inaugural meeting of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association, but it is recorded that he sent his good wishes to this meeting held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16 February 1903.

 

Hodgins, Adam D.S.O. ( - 17/1/1946)

He qualified MRCVS (Dublin) on 23 July 1906 and saw service in South Africa in the A.V.D./A.V.C. from 1 February 1908 to 9 March 1913.

 

Hofmeyer, John Murray (19/3/1941 - 6/10/1984)

"Ian" was born in Johannesburg on 19 March 1941 and was educated at the Pretoria Boys' High School where he matriculated in 1958. In 1962 he obtained a BSc (Agric) degree in Pasture Science at the University of Pretoria and in 1967 qualified as a Veterinarian at the same university. Thereafter he undertook Locum Tenens work to gain clinical experience. In 1969 he did research in Entomology at the V.R.I. Onderstepoort. In 1970 he joined the South West Africa division of Nature Conservation as Veterinarian in charge of game capture and served in this capacity until 1975 when he transferred to the Etosha National Park as Wildlife Veterinarian. He was accidentally killed during a game capture operation on 6 October 1984.

During his lifetime he was involved in 23 investigations and projects and published 20 scientific articles. In addition he presented 11 scientific papers at various scientific congresses. He was a member of 5 wildlife orientated societies.

 

Hogg, Thomas ( - 31/8/1942)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 28 May 2000 and came to South Africa during the Boer War as a Civil Veterinarian attached to the A.V.D. He appears not to have returned to England after the war, because on 6 October 1903 he registered as a Veterinarian in terms of Act No. 21 of 1899 in order that he could practice in Natal. In 1910 he could not be traced in South Africa. He died at Cambridge, England on 31 August 1942.

 

Hoggan, Thomas R.R. ( - 10/9/1953)

He qualified MRCVS (Edinburgh) on 28 May 1892. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinarian attached to the A.V.D. After the war he returned to England. He died at Langley Prairie B.C. Canada on 10 September 1953.

 

Hollingham, Edward Arthur ( - 20/8/1912)

Hollingham was born in Sussex and qualified MRCVS (London) in 1881. In 1893 he settled in Johannesburg and in 1896 opened a private practice in partnership with W. Pye. Being an "Uitlander" he fled from Johannesburg at the commencement of the Boer War and only returned after the cessation of hostilities. In Johannesburg he practiced at 38 Dawe Street, Troyville.

He died of Pneumonia on 20 August 1912. Before coming to South Africa in 1893 he had practiced in Australia, India, England and China.

In March 1895 he, Arnold Theiler, James Richardson and F.A. Britten were appointed Honorary Veterinarians to the first Johannesburg Agricultural Show. When the Municipality of Johannesburg subsequently advertised for a Veterinarian he, together with J. Richardson, F.A. Britten, Osborne, O'Neill, G.H. Pickwell and Arnold Theiler applied for the post - it was given to Arnold Theiler. After 1902 he served for some time in the Volunteer Corps as a Veterinary Officer (Captain) with the Johannesburg Rifles Regiment. For many years he and Arnold Theiler were in strong competition to win over the farmers of Johannesburg as clients.

 

Holness, Capt. Harold James D.S.O. ( - 30/4/1941)

He qualified MRCVS on 22 September 1903 and was a member of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association founded on 16 February 1903. In 1939 he was a Colonel with the D.S.O. in the RAVC. He died on 30 April 1941.

 

Holtz, Harald Eckard Gustav (11/4/1910 - 23/8/1975)

Born at Usona (near Okahandja) in South West Africa on 11 April 1910, he was educated in Germany, but due to the outbreak of the 1st World War he was unable to return to South West Africa until 1920. He subsequently returned to Germany to matriculate and to obtain his Dr. Med. Vet. Degree at the University of Giessen in 1937. For a time thereafter, he served on Rinderpest control duties in Tanganyika as the representative of the Nyasaland Government. On 6 January 1939, he joined the Veterinary Service of the South West Africa Administration and served in various places in South West Africa until he was forced to transfer to South Africa on 24 November 1958 on grounds of ill health.

In South Africa, he was stationed at Port Shepstone in the post vacated by T.A.T. Louw. He continued to serve at Port Shepstone until he retired from the service. He died on 23 August 1975.

From 29 December 1964 to 28 April 1965 he was seconded to South West Africa on special Foot and Mouth disease duties.

His first wife died on 12 May 1961 and he remarried on 29 December 1965.

 

Hopkin, John Watkin (1864 - 24/4/1932)

He graduated MRCVS (London) on 24 May 1893 and it is recorded (Vet. Record Vol. XII No. 20) that he served in the Matabele wars and the war in South Africa and during World War I in the Near East. He died at Henley-on-Thames on 24 April 1932, aged 68 years. During the Boer War he was a Civil Veterinary Surgeon and served some time at Bloemfontein.

 

Horwitz, Barnett Moss (Mark) (17/10/1907 - 1/4/1982)

Born at East London on 17 October 1907 he qualified as a Veterinarian at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort at the end of 1929. After qualifying he joined the Government service and was stationed at Allerton Laboratory from February 1930 to July 1931. Thereafter he practiced at Port Elizabeth where he also served as part time Municipal Veterinary Officer. From September 1937 to October 1940 he was employed by the Municipality on a full time basis in control of the abattoir and milk supply. From September 1940 to 1944 he saw service in the South African Veterinary Corps. From 1944 to 1953 he served as Municipal Veterinary Officer in Cape Town in control of the milk supply. In 1953 he was promoted to Director of the Municipal Abattoir. He served in this capacity until 1968. After his retirement he once again joined the Government service when he was involved with the drafting of the Animal Slaughter, Meat and Animal Products Hygiene Act. He left the Government service in April 1973 when he took up employment with the Department of Medical Microbiology at Tygerberg Hospital as Infection Control Officer. He died in this capacity at Tygerberg Hospital on 1 April 1982.

 

Hoskin, Patric (28/8/1957 - 27/5/1986)

Born in East London on 28 August 1957 he was educated at Grey College, Port Elizabeth. After the completion of his national service he trained as a Veterinarian, receiving his BVSc degree at the University of Pretoria in 1981. After qualifying he travelled overseas for a year and did Locums in South West Africa, the Eastern Cape and Natal, where he married a Miss Pickering.

He finally settled in practice in Port Elizabeth until his death on 27 May 1986 when the microlite aircraft he was flying crashed on take off.

 

Houston, Robert Fisher St. Clair (1873 - 6/12/1912)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 21 December 1895 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa from 23 October 1899 to 9 June 1902. After the war he returned to England. He died on 6 December 1912 in London, aged 39 years.

 

Howard, Samuel George ( - July 1942)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 15 January 1887 and is reported to have set up practice in Port Elizabeth for a short while in 1890. He returned to England and died there in July 1942.

 

Howie, Major Adrian Morrison O.B.E. (7/3/1889 - 3/3/1943)

He qualified MRCVS (Glasgow) on 26 May 1910 and came to South Africa in 1913. In South Africa he joined the Division of Veterinary Field Services and served as Government Veterinary Officer at Umtata, Lydenburg, Greytown (transferred on 29 July 1927), Estcourt, Cape Town (transferred 2 July 1931), East London and back to Cape Town in October 1934. In 1914 he joined the SAVC and saw service in the South West Africa and East Africa Campaigns. For his services he was awarded the O.B.E. and mentioned in dispatches three times.

Together with three other veterinarians, he went to Britain after the East Africa Campaign and joined the RAVC in which he served until the end of hostilities. He was married in Glasgow on 4 February 1919 and returned to South Africa in July 1919 to take up his appointment in Lydenburg. During World War II he again saw service with the SAVC and while on active service he was promoted to the post of Assistant Director of Veterinary Services. However, he never accepted this post, because on the 3rd of March 1943 he died as a result of enemy action when the S.S. Nirpura, the ship on which he was escorting mules to India was torpedoed at 10:30 pm and sank in the Indian Ocean of Port Shepstone. Dr Robert Wilson who was Medical Officer on the same ship and who survived the sinking told the author that Howie and 80 others managed to climb aboard a lifeboat, but were blown out of it by 2 depth charges dropped by a frigate trying to destroy the enemy submarine. When last seen by Dr Wilson, Howie and several others were clinging to the floating hull of the lifeboat. There was a strong gale blowing at the time and it is doubtful if at the age of 54 he would have survived for very long under the prevailing conditions. Five out of the 13 ships in the convoy were sunk and only 3 persons from the Nirpura lifeboat survived. A Staff Sergeant Jacoby of the SAVC survived the first night in the water, but committed suicide the following day by throwing off his lifejacket and sinking. Prior to doing this he handed his watch to Dr Wilson for delivery to his family. It would appear that most of the lives lost were as a result of shark attacks.

D.A. Osbourn BVSc who was in the SAVC during World War II insisted to the author that the Nirpura did not sink immediately after being torpedoed. According to him everyone left the ship after it was torpedoed, but the following day 5 ships officers in a lifeboat found it to be still afloat. However, when they tried to board the injured ship, the German submarine surfaced and ordered them off. The submarine then rendered the Coup de Grace. He says that this information was passed to him in Calcutta by one of the officers concerned. This version does not agree with Dr Wilson's version in that he states that the sharks stopped attacking people in the sea after the ship sank, because they were then presumably concentrating their efforts of the luckless mules who by regulation were kept chained in the holds. Dr Osbourn confirms that Sgt. Major J.W. Killeen RSM and Corporal R. Young who had both served with Howie in World War I, also lost their lives when the Nirpura was sunk.

Howie and his wife sponsored the endowment of a cot at the children's ward of Addington Hospital, Durban in memory of their daughter "Wee" Jean who died on 26 October 1926, aged 6 years. He had four daughters, May, Fiona, Nancy and "Wee" Jean. Mrs Howie and "Wee" Jean are buried in the Greytown Cemetary together with a little boy, Adrian Morrison who died on 16 October 1928 at birth.

Howie's Military Medals, including his O.B.E., are housed in the Museum at the Castle in Cape Town.

 

Huband, Thomas A. ( - 25/12/1923)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 31 March 1881 and served in South Africa during the Boer War as a C.V.S. in the A.V.D.

 

Hughes, Nigel Lindsay Howell (27/8/1962 - 21/9/1989)

Born at Thomson's Falls, Kenya on 27 August 1962 he attended school at Merchiston and Michaelhouse. He obtained his BVSc degree at the Veterinary Faculty, Onderstepoort in mid 1986. Thereafter he was sent to KwaZulu in Natal for his two years National Service, being stationed at Nongoma until June 1988.

In August 1988 he proceeded to England where he undertook locums until his death from a heart attack at Rochester in Kent on 21 September 1989.

 

Hughes, Peter Anthony (20/10/1922 - 19/7/1988)

He was born on the 20th October 1922 in the Woolwich Military Hospital, London. When World War II broke out he joined the brigade of Welsh Guards and served throughout the war as a Sergeant. After the war he, together with another Welsh Guardsman (William Boyt) qualified as Veterinary Surgeons at Liverpool in 1951. After a short stint in private practice in West Riding (Yorkshire) he returned to the army as a Captain in the RAVC and saw service there from 1952 until 1958 being stationed in Austria (1 year), Germany and Kenya (where he was stationed throughout the Mau Mau conflict at Nanyuki).

Before returning to the RAVC Depot at Melton Mowbray he was stationed for a short while in Libya (Benghazi). In 1959 he returned to private practice in Montgomery but resigned after a period of 6 months during which time he had worked without having a single day off duty. Thereafter he practiced at Radnor as an Assistant before joining the Colonial Service and proceeding to Kenya to work in the Athi River meat export plant. In 1965 he came to South Africa and worked first as State Veterinarian at the Estcourt Bacon Factory and then as State Veterinarian Field at Estcourt (having changed places with Allistair Gillespie MRCVS).

In 1967 he resigned this latter post and was proceeding to Rhodesia to take over a new abattoir under construction when he was informed that UDI had been declared and that the erection of the abattoir had been scrapped. Being without employment he was approached by Dr Ike Viljoen in charge of the South West African Veterinary Department to work in that country's meat export plants. He finally returned to South Africa from South West Africa at the end of 1985 and settled in Natal where he died at Howick on the 19th of July 1988.

 

Hulseberg, John Henry ( - 2/2/1914)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 15 December 1897. During the Boer War he saw service in South Africa for an unknown period of time as a Civil Veterinary Surgeon attached to the Army Veterinary Department at Mooi River. After the war he returned to England. He died at the College Hospital, St. Pancras on 2 February 1914.

 

Hunt, Frederick Welsley C.M.G. C.B.E. ( - 23/12/1944)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 10 May 1893 and saw service as a regular A.V.D. officer with the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa (Cape Colony) from 24 September 1896 to 26 March 1903. After service he may have returned to England. However, a E.W. Hunt (possibly the same person) formed part of the SAVMA deputation which on 8 March 1922 met unsuccessfully with the Minister of Agriculture in an attempt to have a Veterinary Surgeons Act drafted through Parliament. The other members of the deputation were Messrs Irvine-Smith, G. de Kock, S.B. Woollatt and 2 M.L.A.s.

 

Hurter, Leon (//1925 - 23/10/1991)

Dr. Leon Hurter, voormalige Streekdirekteur in die Direktoraat Dieregesondheid, is op 23 Oktober 1991, tragies in ’n motorongeluk dood op Pietersburg.

Dr. Hurter wat in 1925 op Ventersdorp gebore is, het hom in 1947 as veearts op Onderstepoort bekwaam.  Hy het daarna as staatsveearts op Potgietersrus begin werk voordat hy na Natal verhuis het.  In 1957 het hy na Potgietersrus teruggekeer waar, soos hy dit gestel het:  “Die hardekool groei en die beesvleis sag en sappig is.”  Hy is in 1972 bevorder tot Streeksdirekteur, Dieregesondheid van die Noord- en Oos-Transvaalstreek in Pietersburg, waar hy in 1985 afgetree het.

Dr. Hurter sal veral onthou word vir sy fyn humorsin en sy vermoë om so baie amptelike dinge op ’n nie-amptelike manier vinnig en reg gedoen te kry.  Veeboere sal hom onthou vir die manier waarop hy uit sy pad gegaan het om nouer samewerking tussen amptenaar en veeboer te bewerkstellig – ’n filosofie wat hy met oorgawe met al sy kollegas wou deel.  Velerlei boere-dae en saamtrekke met die georganiseerde landbou is onder sy leiding in die bosveld van die verre Noord-Transvaal van staple gestuur.  As erkenning hiervoor is hy heel gepas met lewenslange erelidmaatskap van die Transvaalse Landbou-unie vereer.  Hy is die outeur van die welekende boek Veeartsenykunde vir die praktiese boer wat ’n lewende nalatenskap van sy lewensfilosofie is.

 

Hutcheon, Duncan (27/6/1842 - 14/5/1907)

Born Peterhead, Scotland on 27 June 1842, he qualified MRCVS at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh in 1871 (a 3 year course). On 22 April 1880 he was appointed as the Second Chief Veterinary Surgeon of the Cape of Good Hope in succession to Professor W.C. Branford. In 1905 he was promoted to the post of Acting Director of Agriculture and in 1906 his appointment to this post was confirmed (he was then 64 years old). His death occurred on 14 May 1907 and he was buried in the Mowbray Cemetary.

During his lifetime he was an intelligent investigator, very hard working and in view of subsequent events must have been a likeable and popular official. At all times (even in the country) he wore a frockcoat and top-hat.

He frequently visited the Government experimental farm Leeufontein in the Fort Beaufort district in spite of the fact that in 1880 a tour of duty through Caledon, Bredasdorp, Swellendam, Riversdale, Mossel Bay, George, Humansdorp, Uitenhage, Port Elizabeth, Albany to Leeufontein took 51 days (21st June to 10th August). Although he was not always able to diagnose the disease conditions he encountered, he described them so well that in later years it was possible to make a diagnosis from his descriptive notes. His records of the introduction of various diseases into South Africa are of considerable aid to the historian, e.g.

1. Bovine Pleuro-pneumonia was introduced by the importation of a bull from Holland in 1854.

2. In December 1880, H. David & Co. of Somerset East, imported a number of Angora goats. These goats left Angora on 1 October 1880, travelled by ship via Constantinople and Southampton and arrived in Port Elizabeth in mid-December. They were then railed from Port Elizabeth to Cookhouse where they arrived on the 22nd of December 1880. From Cookhouse they were conveyed by wagon to Somerset East and kept in Mr David's yard until the day of the sale on 26 January 1881. There had seemingly been no mortality up to that time. A Mr Van Niekerk of Brakfontein bought one of the rams. This ram arrived on his farm on 27 January 1881. It was shorn and dressed with tobacco extract on 28 January 1881. On the following day it sickened and died a few days later - and so commenced a large scale of Pleuro-pneumonia which was only brought under control by the slaughter out of 6 162 goats valued at 2 878 pounds.

3. Mortality amongst fowls in the Bedford district in 1882 was diagnosed as "Fowl Cholera recently described in France".

4. Foot and Mouth disease was present in Bechuanaland and Griqualand West in 1892/93.

5. Foot and Mouth disease entered the Cape Colony and was spread by cattle railed for slaughter from Beaufort West to Piquetberg Road in 1893.

6. In 1893/94 Foot and Mouth disease was present in all four provinces.

7. A Rabies outbreak occurred in 1893, following on the importation of an Airdale dog into Port Elizabeth in 1892 (The original diagnoses being made by a veterinarian F.A. Britten).

8. In 1898 Equine Pleuro-pneumonia was introduced into the Cape Colony by imported horses.

While working alone in the Cape Colony from 1880, he was finally given several assistants to cope with his mammoth tasks. J.D. Borthwick joined him in February 1889, J.F. Soga in 1891, Otto Henning in March 1892, Hutchence, Crowhurst, Dixon and Pattison in December 1892, and William Robertson in 1896. The appointment of Alexander Edington (A Medic) as Government Bacteriologist in 1891, further extended his fields of activity.

In 1902 he was made an honorary associate of the Royal College of Veterinarians. On his death in 1907 and in consideration of his financial circumstances, the members of the Cape Province Agricultural Union subscribed some 5 000 pounds towards the maintenance of his widow. After the death of Mrs Hutcheon, the fund was offered by the Cape Agricultural Union in 1947 as a bursary in Veterinary Science in commemoration of the late Duncan Hutcheon. This bursary, valued at 40 pounds is awarded annually by the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Pretoria to the most deserving 4th year Veterinary student from the Cape Province. Duncan Hutcheon was a founder member of the Transvaal Veterinary Medical Association and attended the inaugural meeting held at Long's Hotel, Johannesburg on 16 January 1903. He was also possibly a founder member of the Cape of Good Hope Veterinary Medical Association founded on 1 November 1905.

 

Hutchence, M.A. ( - 5/1/1911)

He qualified MRCVS (London) on 16 May 1890 and came to South Africa on 10 December 1893 together with 3 other veterinarians (Crowhurst, Dixon and Pattison) recruited by Duncan Hutcheon to serve in the Civil Veterinary Department of the Cape Colony. In 1908 he was Government Veterinary Officer at Kokstad. He died on 5 January 1911.

 

Hutchinson, Fred H. (17/1/1869 - 20/3/1939)

Born on 17 January 1869 at Foggathorpe, Yorkshire, he was one of three brothers all of whom were veterinarians. He qualified MRCVS (New Edinburgh) on 30 May 1889 and came to South Africa to manage the farm Beginsel in the Standerton district. In 1898 together with Cordy, Byrne, Harber, Woollatt, Ashe and Amos, he joined the Natal Civil Veterinary Department and was stationed at Newcastle in succession to J.W. Stapley. At the outbreak of the Boer War he was commissioned (Captain) in the Army Veterinary Department and placed in charge of remounts at the Point, Durban. After the Boer War he returned to his civil post at Newcastle and remained there until his headquarters was moved to Dundee in 1909. During World War I he saw military service with the SAVC with the rank of Major. In 1921 he was transferred to Pretoria as S.V.O. Transvaal and served in that position until he retired in 1925.

After his retirement he settled at Hilton where he remained until his death on 20 March 1939. He is buried in plot A.716 Mountain Rise Cemetery, Pietermaritzburg together with his wife May Alice who died on 9 July 1956.

 

Hutton, George Allen ( - 1889)

In addition to being a Medic (Assistant Surgeon to the 12th Regiment, Grahamstown) he was also a qualified veterinarian having obtained his MRCVS (London) in May 1853. After the introduction of Lungsickness from Holland in 1854 he was called upon by the Governor of the Cape Colony, Sir George Grey to investigate the problem. He also submitted a report on Horsesickness which was reproduced by Bayley (1856). He considered Horsesickness to be a "specific disease". He died in 1889.